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← Non-voters: It's all in God's hands

Non-voters: It's all in God's hands - Comments

suffolkthinker's Avatar Comment 1 by suffolkthinker

And how is this a bad thing? :-)

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:23:00 UTC | #190198

Oromasdes1978's Avatar Comment 2 by Oromasdes1978

God is taking care of things.


Phew, thank goodness for that! For a minute there I thought Yahweh had that lackadaisical type of character that contributed bugger all to the working of the entire universe, but I guess I was mistaken!

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:23:00 UTC | #190199

B.L.Z. Bub's Avatar Comment 3 by B.L.Z. Bub

Could be just a correlation? I think there is evidence to suggest that those who have been poorly educated or not done well in education (i.e. bit dim) tend to take less interest in politics and are less likely to get involved in civic affairs. Such people might also be the ones most readily suckered into the type of church talked about above.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:24:00 UTC | #190200

eh-theist's Avatar Comment 4 by eh-theist

I think this is great news! Trey Parker and Matt Stone did tackle this issue when P. Diddy and friends came out with "Vote or Die" by basically saying "If you aren't educated on the issues, don't vote." (Trey also wrote a song about it :) )

If you believe the rapture is coming in 50 years, you shouldn't be deciding who should be making policies for your country. Policies of today will affect your country long after the rapture doesn't happen.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:45:00 UTC | #190205

Al420's Avatar Comment 5 by Al420

I think it could very well be a correlation, in that people who don't take an interest in world affairs are more likely to believe in a god who takes care of things for them. It's like the violent video game debate; Do violent video games make children violent, or are violent children drawn to violent things?

I like how they put the civil rights movement and christian conservativism in a sentence as if they were along the same lines. Nice try.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:50:00 UTC | #190207

Tack's Avatar Comment 6 by Tack

If non-believers are more likely to be liberals, and believers are less likely to vote, then why do republicans keep getting elected?

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:51:00 UTC | #190208

notsobad's Avatar Comment 7 by notsobad

There are still enough idiots to vote so ...

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 07:55:00 UTC | #190210

Dhamma's Avatar Comment 8 by Dhamma

I agree, people who don't know jack about politics really shouldn't vote either. In Sweden virtually everyone votes, which could be really good, if they had better knowledge than my friend who voted on the centre party with the motivation "I voted the centre party because I didn't know what the others stood for, and they were in the middle, so they can't be that bad", sadly I know many who votes without better knowledge. For some reason people here are so proud we all vote. Please, leave it up to those who at least know we're a monarchy.

I definitely believe we have a more knowledgeable voter-core than most, but who cares when everyone's competing for the last price?

If the americans don't vote because they believe God will make the best choice anyway, I do find it very scary so many can believe such bs.

Tack: The non-believers are still such a minority it hardly matters most of them are liberals.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:02:00 UTC | #190212

foolish sea otter's Avatar Comment 9 by foolish sea otter

RE: Comment #200281 by eh-theist.
"Vote or Die" by basically saying "If you aren't educated on the issues, don't vote."

It was more like if the choices are between a giant douche and a turd sandwich what's the point of voting?

EDIT: But then how does this fit in?

http://www.richarddawkins.net/article,2746,Pastors-Challenge-Law-Endorse-Candidates-From-Pulpit,ABC-News

/edit

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:07:00 UTC | #190217

justdust's Avatar Comment 10 by justdust

Am I correct in thinking that Jehovas Witnesses are encouraged/instructed not to vote?

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:20:00 UTC | #190221

82abhilash's Avatar Comment 12 by 82abhilash


9. Comment #200294 by foolish sea otter on June 27, 2008 at 9:07 am

RE: Comment #200281 by eh-theist.
"Vote or Die" by basically saying "If you aren't educated on the issues, don't vote."

It was more like if the choices are between a giant douche and a turd sandwich what's the point of voting?

EDIT: But then how does this fit in?

http://www.richarddawkins.net/article,2746,Pastors-Challenge-Law-Endorse-Candidates-From-Pulpit,ABC-News

/edit



Looks to me like the religious vote when the representatives of their benevolent dictator (the pastors who talk for god), tells them to and they vote to those they are told to vote for (whom they 'endorse'). In other words the pastors think for them. That kind of people are a prized vote bank for politicians. People who think for themselves, makes politicians to earn their vote by actually doing good work.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:25:00 UTC | #190226

Oystein Elgaroy's Avatar Comment 11 by Oystein Elgaroy

I think reality might be more complicated. When issues like abortion and gay marriage are on the agenda, fundamentalists who think their god is actively involved in the affairs of this planet will sometimes argue that it is a Christian duty to vote for parties with the right bronze-age attitude. If you don't vote, God will be angry and punish the whole nation. I know about a few groups of fundamentalists in my country who think like this.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:25:00 UTC | #190225

decius's Avatar Comment 13 by decius

On a side note, a politician is the last person to which I would donate money (aside from anyone even remotely affiliated with the clergy, of course).

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:31:00 UTC | #190229

LUCASWB's Avatar Comment 15 by LUCASWB

I am voting for Obama. some of my christian conservative friends tell me there is a good chance he is the anti-christ. I tell them that means they should vote for him too so we can get this thing moving along, and bring on the rapture.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:38:00 UTC | #190234

Diacanu's Avatar Comment 14 by Diacanu


"It can be reasoned that if one believes God determines worldly affairs, then there is little reason for individuals to participate in civic events,"


Of course, that likely had to be translated from the patterns of moaning, drooling, slurring, and gasping from the subjects momentarily forgetting how to breathe.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:38:00 UTC | #190233

Vecingetorix's Avatar Comment 16 by Vecingetorix

Just to point out that there are more candidates involved in this election than those the media deigns to cover, including one that has a decidedly more secular bent.

You don't have to choose one of the two versions of the same party.
PSA

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:42:00 UTC | #190235

Diacanu's Avatar Comment 17 by Diacanu

Vecingetorix-

*Head pat* Yeah, that's nice, why don't I just write in Daffy Duck while I'm at it too, eh?

Now go to sleep.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 08:49:00 UTC | #190240

Vecingetorix's Avatar Comment 18 by Vecingetorix

Good job.

Way to be blandly patronising.

Hopelessness has never been employed before on this issue.

Thanks for something completely different.

Do I need to be predictable and point out where this isn't helpful?


on a somewhat related note, anyone see this yet?
http://www.yahoo.com/s/907672

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 09:10:00 UTC | #190247

Diacanu's Avatar Comment 19 by Diacanu

Vacingetorix-

Ah, so you agree that the system is decaying, and we're all going to die screaming and writhing?

Good, glad we're on the same page. :)

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 09:17:00 UTC | #190251

Sciros's Avatar Comment 20 by Sciros

When I was graduating HS and our chess club was having a vote for next year's officers (the graduating seniors were able to vote as well...), Batman got more votes as a write-in than any of the people who actually ran.

I think a "Batman for president" campaign needs to be promoted.

Presidential elections are a funny business because voters' priorities are so different. Some people care about health care reform, while others care about what the future administration's response would be to another shit-hits-the-fan terrorist attack. There's no "best in all cases" candidate, ever, making me feel like I'm just rolling dice whenever I'm voting.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 09:25:00 UTC | #190254

Diacanu's Avatar Comment 21 by Diacanu

Sciros-


I think a "Batman for president" campaign needs to be promoted.


Sounds like a plan to me.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 09:37:00 UTC | #190259

notsobad's Avatar Comment 22 by notsobad

Carlin on voting:

Now, there's one thing you might have noticed; I don't complain about politicians. Everybody complains about politicians. Everybody says they suck. Well, where do people think these politicians come from? They don't fall out of the sky. They don't pass through a membrane from another reality. They come from American parents and American families, American homes, American schools, American churches, American businesses and American universities, and they are elected by American citizens.
This is the best we can do folks. This is what we have to offer. It's what our system produces: Garbage in, garbage out.
If you have selfish, ignorant citizens, you're going to get selfish, ignorant leaders.
Term limits ain't going to do any good; you're just going to end up with a brand new bunch of selfish, ignorant Americans.
So, maybe, maybe, maybe, it's not the politicians who suck. Maybe something else sucks around here... like, the public. Yeah, the public sucks. There's a nice campaign slogan for somebody: 'The Public Sucks. Fuck Hope.'

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 09:38:00 UTC | #190261

br0k3nglass's Avatar Comment 23 by br0k3nglass

Makes sense to me. Growing up as a Jehovah's Witness I was taught to remain neutral in world affairs and instead focus on supporting God in heralding forth his glorious kingdom which was soon to be implemented on Earth.

The first time I voted in my life was last year (I was 25).

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 09:45:00 UTC | #190265

black wolf's Avatar Comment 24 by black wolf

Robert Mugabe claims that God wants him to rule. So, he forces the people at gunpoint to go to the election and vote for him. Guess who his role model is?

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 10:00:00 UTC | #190267

Dr. Strangegod's Avatar Comment 25 by Dr. Strangegod

The results are part of the nationally representative Baylor Religion Survey, 2005.


Total crap.

"It can be reasoned that if one believes God determines worldly affairs, then there is little reason for individuals to participate in civic events," study leader Robyn Driskell and her colleagues write in the June issue of the journal Social Science Quarterly.


And that's why. Also...

Sample size: 1,700. Total US Population: 305,000,000. So your findings, which make claims about how all Americans vote, are based on .000557% of the populace. Ooooo-kay...

LUCASWB - For Galactus's sake, please change your name. Or should I change mine to DiacanuX51 or SteveZarablara or Ron-the-Fermenter? And why in the world do you even have Christian conservative friends?

Sciros - Yes, Batman. I explained once when this site was only a week old that all my morals come from Batman and cowboy movies. Back then, my handle on this site actually was Batman. I think aspiring to be as much like Batman as possible is a great thing.

'The Public Sucks. Fuck Hope.' - Ha ha ha ha ha ha!!! I want that on a t-shirt.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 10:51:00 UTC | #190282

TeraBrat's Avatar Comment 26 by TeraBrat

My parents are religious and they vote. The Jewish vote is so strong in the US because almost all Jews vote, religious or not.

I really hope the Muslims believe they don't need to vote.

3. Comment #200276 by B.L.Z. Bub on June 27, 2008 at 8:24 am

Could be just a correlation? I think there is evidence to suggest that those who have been poorly educated or not done well in education (i.e. bit dim) tend to take less interest in politics and are less likely to get involved in civic affairs. Such people might also be the ones most readily suckered into the type of church talked about above.


I agree.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 11:17:00 UTC | #190291

Maybeline's Avatar Comment 27 by Maybeline

*Could be just a correlation? I think there is evidence to suggest that those who have been poorly educated or not done well in education (i.e. bit dim) tend to take less interest in politics and are less likely to get involved in civic affairs. Such people might also be the ones most readily suckered into the type of church talked about above.*

to BLZBub:

Do you have proof of this or is it just a belief?

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 11:24:00 UTC | #190294

Koreman's Avatar Comment 28 by Koreman

Voters or not, that Louisiana bill has been signed. Fairytales in science class is now OK.

http://www.badastronomy.com/bablog/2008/06/27/louisiana-well-thats-it-then/

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 11:27:00 UTC | #190299

al-rawandi's Avatar Comment 29 by al-rawandi

Tera Bat,




I really hope the Muslims believe they don't need to vote.




Me too.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 11:32:00 UTC | #190302

Sciros's Avatar Comment 30 by Sciros

Voters or not, that Louisiana bill has been signed. Fairytales in science class is now OK.

Awesome. Not like I ever wanted to move to that rubbish part of the country anyway. It's already in the bottom 5 in education among states, as expected.

I'm thinking it will be challenged and killerized by a federal court at some point in the near future. If not, it'll probably lead to yet more bills of this sort passed in other states who want to join Louisiana as retard factories.

Fri, 27 Jun 2008 11:52:00 UTC | #190307