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← Texas State Board of Education approves Bible course for high schools

Texas State Board of Education approves Bible course for high schools - Comments

IaninPA's Avatar Comment 1 by IaninPA

If it's elective why not. Let 'em have this one.

It's not like kids who would go to an elective bible class aren't getting it rammed down their throats at Sunday school anyway.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:19:00 UTC | #202571

Ascaphus's Avatar Comment 2 by Ascaphus

I can't wait to see the disclaimer they'll be forced to put into the textbook. :)

Matt

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:22:00 UTC | #202572

padster1976's Avatar Comment 3 by padster1976

The perception is that america is really going back in time - 16th Century here we come!

Shittsville!!

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:24:00 UTC | #202577

TIKI AL's Avatar Comment 4 by TIKI AL

OK, but the classes must be taught by an impartial teacher who registers at least a 6.9-infinity on the Dawkins scale.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:28:00 UTC | #202579

Apathy personified's Avatar Comment 5 by Apathy personified

Ian,
I wonder what would happen if the bible class was taught with the 'wrong' interpretation - say if it's given the pentecostal treatment, when half the kids in the class are from baptist families?

What sort of legal issues does that raise?

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:28:00 UTC | #202580

mdowe's Avatar Comment 6 by mdowe

Now we just need some Texas teachers with solid science or philosophical backgrounds to come fourth and teach these classes. Maybe the kids could learn how to apply some critical thinking to religious claims as a result.

(N.B. -- Perhaps the kids could also get a better appreciation of the Bible as literature, and its role in history and the development of Western culture!)

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:30:00 UTC | #202581

robotaholic's Avatar Comment 7 by robotaholic

this is soooooooo stupid

I objectively don't see how they can omit other religious books like the torah or the koran from being available (just for fairness)

many schools might unknowingly create unconstitutional Bible classes that either promote the religious views of teachers or disparage the religious beliefs of some students

-This is going to be a disaster I think

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:32:00 UTC | #202586

Sophie's Avatar Comment 8 by Sophie

Apathy,

Yeah, I agree. What if there is one mormon sitting in with those students as well? LOL

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:34:00 UTC | #202587

Mark Smith's Avatar Comment 9 by Mark Smith

I am all for education about the Bible (as long is that is what actually happens). All things being equal, the more somebody learns about the Bible the more opportunity they have to realise what a very human, fallible product it is.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:35:00 UTC | #202589

Sciros's Avatar Comment 10 by Sciros

Bible study, now for grades!

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:37:00 UTC | #202594

Mango's Avatar Comment 11 by Mango

This will only end badly for Texas, in court.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:40:00 UTC | #202595

TIKI AL's Avatar Comment 12 by TIKI AL

Will there be comparisons to other factually accurate books such as "Pinnochio" and "Jack and the Bean Stalk"?

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:44:00 UTC | #202598

Stormkahn's Avatar Comment 14 by Stormkahn

WTF is a Bible course?

a) Religous Education about all faiths
b) Being taught about the bible
c) Being indoctrinated with the bible
d) DIY religous texts for beginners

and for bonus points can we have Pastafarianism?

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:46:00 UTC | #202600

Apathy personified's Avatar Comment 13 by Apathy personified

Sophie,

What if there is one mormon sitting in with those students as well?
Ha - I guess the magic underpants would certainly get in a twist.
They could well be opening a Pandora's box here.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:46:00 UTC | #202599

cerad's Avatar Comment 15 by cerad

Some folks insist that atheism is a religion. So lets see them come up with a bible study class that doesn't disparage the views of an atheist student.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:49:00 UTC | #202602

Frankus1122's Avatar Comment 16 by Frankus1122

Comment #213552 by Stormkahn

and for bonus points can we have Pastafarianism?


I say go for full blown Rastafarianism.
Spliff Rolling 101

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:55:00 UTC | #202605

thewhitepearl's Avatar Comment 17 by thewhitepearl

I don't mind an elective being taught about religion in highschool..But the problem I have with this is, they are only offering a BIBLE class..

This is just a ticking time bomb. I need a paper bag to breathe into..

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:57:00 UTC | #202607

foolish sea otter's Avatar Comment 18 by foolish sea otter

Frankus1122,

Ugh, not with the stuff smuggled into Texas.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 13:58:00 UTC | #202608

TIKI AL's Avatar Comment 19 by TIKI AL

"This is just a ticking time bomb. I need a paper bag to breathe into.." (#17,twp)

...speaking of time bombs, breathing into a paper bag after drinking vodka can be very illuminating.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:12:00 UTC | #202615

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 20 by Border Collie

'many schools might unknowingly create unconstitutional Bible classes that promote ... disparage, etc.' 'Might' my ass. 'Unknowingly' my ass. 'Unconstitutional' yes. 'Promote' certainly. 'Disparage' for sure. TWP ... the bomb has gone off ... it's just not real loud yet. Being a Texan, this makes me sick. There's a good interview on Fox today about this with Barry Lynn and some wing nut. Like there aren't enough churches and church schools in Texas to teach Bible stuff ... Oh, well, just another nail in the coffin of Texas education which had already gone to hell in a handbasket.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:15:00 UTC | #202617

sidelined's Avatar Comment 22 by sidelined

I do fail to see how, having here set precedent,they will be able to prevent the teaching{as an elective} of The Koran,Torah,Tibetan Book of the Dead etc..

For that matter why would there not be a case made for the introduction of new age codswallop as well.
Yaaaaay... Texas! Remember to be careful what you wish for.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:16:00 UTC | #202620

SimUser's Avatar Comment 21 by SimUser

Best way to counter this is to argue that they need to allow all religions to be taught in equal measure, so first we will teach about Bael, then Wotan, then Thor, then any number, and some time we will get to your Christian God.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:16:00 UTC | #202619

Mark Smith's Avatar Comment 23 by Mark Smith

The Bible is just a collection of words. If there is a danger in having lessons about it, then it is surely a fault of the American education system, not a fault of the proposed subject. Can't you trust American teachers to teach properly?

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:18:00 UTC | #202621

wiz220's Avatar Comment 24 by wiz220

TEACH THE CONTROVERSY!!! Richard should be a required guest speaker in all of these classes to point out the "gaps" in religious "theory"!

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:22:00 UTC | #202622

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 25 by Border Collie

Pardon me while I play devil's advocate for education for a moment. My feeling, and this is just me, is that the public schools in Texas should actually teach subject's like math, English, reading, science, geography, history ... you know. I mean, have the kids able to read on at least a sixth grade level by the time they graduate from high school, maybe have the skills to balance a checkbook, know that astronomy is science, astrology isn't, be able to find Texas on a map of the US and be able to find the US on a world map, know that Shakesphere actually existed and maybe know that there is such a thing as history. I know this is a radical idea but a guy has to start somewhere. Lastly, can we please postpone the Bible stuff until college or never and just keep it trapped at church and church schools until then?

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:30:00 UTC | #202623

Ascaphus's Avatar Comment 26 by Ascaphus

#23 by Mark: Can't we trust the teachers? I'd like to think so too, but then I just discovered that we have a creationist scuttling the science classes right here where I live. Talk to a teacher and they'll tell you that they don't design their own curriculum, it's all handed down by the state... It's just not a simple problem.

But I just had a brainstorm! Bush has been pushing his "faith-based" initiative to have churches accept federal money for programs, and Obama is threatening to keep it up. Now the schools want to teach bible classes. Well, if the faith community wants to help the overburdened schools, they can move the new bible classes to the churches, and the government will now pay them to 'study' the bible! It's perfect. I'll go write to my congressman now.

Matt

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:31:00 UTC | #202624

MorituriMax's Avatar Comment 27 by MorituriMax

Prince should remake his song then at the meeting where they set the final guidelines for the courses, he can belt out..

"We're gonna PARTY like it's 1399!"

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:37:00 UTC | #202625

Quine's Avatar Comment 28 by Quine

Bible study is a good thing. They should study who wrote it, who rewrote it, the interpolations, the translation errors, the copy errors, the process of choosing which books would be in v. out, etc.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:40:00 UTC | #202626

TIKI AL's Avatar Comment 30 by TIKI AL

Can't wait for the first 14th amendment lawsuit to render the schoolboard unemployed and bankrupt the town when it is discovered that there is no "Children's Book of Kwanzaa" study class.

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:42:00 UTC | #202628

thewhitepearl's Avatar Comment 29 by thewhitepearl

speaking of time bombs, breathing into a paper bag after drinking vodka can be very illuminating.


cute...reeaaaaal cute..

:)

Fri, 18 Jul 2008 14:42:00 UTC | #202627