This site is not maintained. Click here for the new website of Richard Dawkins.

First draft of Neanderthal genome is unveiled

Thanks to Ivan Bailey for the link.

Reposted from:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16587-first-draft-of-neanderthal-genome-is-unveiled.html?full=true

The first draft of the genome of a 38,000 year-old Neanderthal is complete, scientists announced today.

Early glimpses of the genome, which was sequenced by Svante Pääbo, of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues, have already cast new light on the ancient human species that went extinct more than 25,000 years ago.

"This will be the first time the entire genome of an extinct organism has been sequenced," Pääbo told the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in Chicago.

Continue reading:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16587-first-draft-of-neanderthal-genome-is-unveiled.html?full=true

TAGGED: EVOLUTION, GENETICS


RELATED CONTENT

Blogging the Human Genome

Sam Kean - Slate Comments

Blogging the Human Genome

Scientists place 500-million-year-old...

- - PhysOrg.com Comments

Using a process called paleo-experimental evolution, Georgia Tech researchers have resurrected a 500-million-year-old gene from bacteria and inserted it into modern-day Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. This bacterium has now been growing for more than 1,000 generations, giving the scientists a front row seat to observe evolution in action. Credit: Georgia Institute of Technology

Q&A: Plant scientists answer your...

- - Sense About Science 6 Comments

Welcome to this questions and answer session on cross fertilisation, which has also been called contamination, with Wendy harwood and Huw Jones.

Open letter and video re threat to GM...

Rothamsted Research - YouTube/Sense... 79 Comments

Add your support to the appeal from scientists at the publicly funded Rothamsted Research: Don't Destroy Our Research.

Finding Phenotypes

Edyta Zielinska - TheScientist 7 Comments

Genes shared across species that produce different phenotypes—deafness in humans and directional growth in plants—may reveal new models of disease.

Synthetic Genetic Evolution

Ruth Williams - TheScientist 9 Comments


Synthetic Genetic Evolution

MORE

Comments

Comment RSS Feed

Please sign in or register to comment