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← Kerala girl defies threats, wears jeans - not burqa

Kerala girl defies threats, wears jeans - not burqa - Comments

Raiko's Avatar Comment 1 by Raiko

What a brave young woman. I'm very worried for her life, but I'm glad the police seems to be on her side.

I wish her the best and that other women will take an example in her bravery. I wish her the best of luck and safety.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:09:52 UTC | #521945

God fearing Atheist's Avatar Comment 2 by God fearing Atheist

Indian police can't trace mobile phone calls! WTF!

If that excuse came from the UK police you would know you had been told to "Fuck off". So in India that is either "Sorry we are crap, we are a 3rd world police force with 3rd world technology" or "Fuck off".

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:17:03 UTC | #521953

Slugsie's Avatar Comment 3 by Slugsie

And here I thought that the choice to wear the Burqa was down to the individual. At least that's what we keep being told here in the west whenever someone speaks out against such attire.

Double standards at all?

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:22:57 UTC | #521957

green and dying's Avatar Comment 4 by green and dying

I wonder whether the threats are from her (non-nuclear) family?

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:23:24 UTC | #521958

helen sotiriadis's Avatar Comment 5 by helen sotiriadis

where are all the voices that defend a woman's right to wear a burqa? are they defending this girl as well?

brave girl.

Updated: Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:26:29 UTC | #521961

TheRationalizer's Avatar Comment 6 by TheRationalizer

Comment 5 by helen sotiriadis :

where are all the voices that defend a woman's right to wear a burqa? are they defending this girl as well?

Here is one, and yes I am defending her rights too!

Someone not wearing the Burqa through choice is freedom, being forced not to wear one is nothing more than having a different oppressor.

Good on her, I hope others can be as brave!

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:43:05 UTC | #521981

helen sotiriadis's Avatar Comment 7 by helen sotiriadis

Comment 6 by TheRationalizer :

Here is one, and yes I am defending her rights too!

the burqa is a ban on the freedom to dress as one likes.

as soon as people wear it any culture, with any religion, as soon as men wear burqas as well, then it will be a free choice.

Updated: Mon, 20 Sep 2010 14:58:53 UTC | #521990

Richard Dawkins's Avatar Comment 8 by Richard Dawkins

"I was even accused of having converted and married into another religion. But I wasn't worried as I'm a true Muslim," says the feisty young woman.

If only she were a bit more feisty she would cease to be a Muslim altogether – except that would make her an apostate, for which the Religion of Peace demands stoning. Indeed, you'll probably find she'd be sentenced to 99 lashes just for the crime of being feisty.

Richard

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 15:13:52 UTC | #522001

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 9 by Peter Grant

If only more Muslim woman were this brave and intelligent. This chick is my new hero.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 15:47:23 UTC | #522017

godsbelow's Avatar Comment 10 by godsbelow

Good for her. I particularly admire this brave and noble statement:

"It's better to live fearlessly for an hour than to serve such people for a 100 years."

There is something deeply, psychologically wrong with people who find the human body "offensive" and want to cover it up. It is a testament to the \ perversity and inhumanity of Islam that it makes supposedly heterosexual males hate the female form (which is surely one of evolution's greatest masterpieces).

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 15:51:48 UTC | #522019

-TheCodeCrack-'s Avatar Comment 11 by -TheCodeCrack-

Nothing more scary than being born into the religion of peace.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 15:57:41 UTC | #522022

crookedshoes's Avatar Comment 12 by crookedshoes

The sentence " i have covered up everything that needs to be fully covered." Makes me crazy. I think about how short my life would be if I were unlucky enough to be born there. Or, alternately, how awful my life would be having to adhere to these inane, random bullshit rules. MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 15:58:23 UTC | #522023

mordacious1's Avatar Comment 13 by mordacious1

The reason she has not been stoned or whipped is probably because Kerala is predominately Hindu. I'm sure she can walk around in her jeans and no one knows she's a muslim. She has to fear the other muslims who know who she is of course, but in Kerala, she has the protection of the government, unlike countries where islam and the government are the same.

Hopefully, this is a first step toward a total break from islam.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 16:08:34 UTC | #522033

AtheistEgbert's Avatar Comment 14 by AtheistEgbert

Another hero. Heroes are coming out more and more and deserve our support. Shame that most of our leaders and media are utter cowards.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 16:14:16 UTC | #522035

RamziD's Avatar Comment 15 by RamziD

This will be the first and last time you ever hear me say this, so here it goes: You go girl!

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 17:06:02 UTC | #522064

JJFinch's Avatar Comment 16 by JJFinch

Comment 8 by Richard Dawkins :

If only she were a bit more feisty she would cease to be a Muslim altogether > Richard

No offence, Professor, but that seems a little bit harsh. It's all very well saying that people who don't agree with their religion should just leave it, but if her whole family (and they are obviously a supportive and liberal family) and her whole society are Muslims, no one can ask her to voluntarily estrange herself from them (I know you'll say that if her family is that supportive they won't estrange her for not being a Muslim, but she'd have to take the risk to find out, and things are more complicated than that, as I'm sure you know). Isn't she doing more than she could possibly be asked to by putting her life in danger to stand up for her (and all women's) rights? And it sounds as if she is a believing Muslim - OK, we might not agree with that, but it's her choice, and she has clearly not allowed herself to be brainwashed into thinking that in order to believe something she has to submit to oppression. I think to expect any more from her is just not realistic or fair.

(Re-reading your comment, I realise you probably weren't actually saying that she's fallen short of your expectations by not renouncing Islam - did you just say that so that you could make the comments about stoning that followed? In that case, that's fair enough...)

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 17:11:24 UTC | #522068

RSingh's Avatar Comment 17 by RSingh

she is true "true" muslim woman!! Should not she wear the tent then?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks Richard for nailing on this...I could not comment on this while in office!

Also, she implied that she could not have married a kuffar as she is 'true' muslim.......good for her...I wish she were born in Pakistan/Iran with this attitude

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 17:14:11 UTC | #522070

Cartomancer's Avatar Comment 18 by Cartomancer

This is a worrying story, but the encouraging thing is that it's an unusual occurrence in Kerala - worthy of reportage in a way it simply wouldn't be in other, more muslim-dominated, parts of India. Were this the Punjab or Kashmir, I very much doubt it would have been considered news at all - both because such threats are massively more common there, and because Ms. Khasi would have been too frightened to stand up for her rights.

Note that she is studying to become an engineer and a civil servant, and that this goes utterly without comment. Kerala has made massive strides forward over the last forty years in its attempts to educate women, improve their social status, and hence reduce family sizes, decrease poverty and increase standards of living. And by all objective statistical measures it has worked, and continues to work - today standards of living are consistently higher there than anywhere else in India, where they used to be indistinguishable. Kerala is a case study in what should be done in order to improve the lot of people in poverty-stricken areas.

In a way, this story exemplifies that progress. It is gratifying that women DO stand up for themselves in Kerala, and that the authorities are siding with her and against the bigots. It is almost certainly the case that they do so thanks to the wider social changes and continued investment in education and equality measures.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 18:09:57 UTC | #522107

mlgatheist's Avatar Comment 19 by mlgatheist

Comment 6 by TheRationalizer

being forced not to wear one is nothing more than having a different oppressor.

There is a rational reason to ban the burqa. Security cameras are of no use if someone in a burqa can hide their identity.

Also, whether or not you are willing to admit this, the only reason a woman would truely want to wear one is if as a child they were brainwashed into thinking that this was what they should wear.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 18:44:48 UTC | #522124

Son_Of's Avatar Comment 20 by Son_Of

strength in numbers, it would be good if lots of women in Kerala would stand with her.

as an aside, "peeved" is a strange adjective to describe someone who receives frequent death threats!

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 18:57:26 UTC | #522130

Lonesome George's Avatar Comment 21 by Lonesome George

When they say burqa in this article do they not mean veil because I thought most Indian muslims dont wear the burqa but I could be wrong.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 19:02:30 UTC | #522134

Moosebite's Avatar Comment 22 by Moosebite

@ RD:

"crime of being feisty"??? I think you just made that crime up.

And I kind of agree with JJFinch; when I read this story, one of my first responses was to cringe at the line - "But I wasn't worried as I'm a true Muslim". And I thought "why not go the whole nine yards, honey... You're so close". However, to me this seems like an incredibly brave and controversial stance for this girl to take - that is unless all of my preconceptions of traditional Muslim communities are ill-founded. So in the battle of consciousness-raising, I would say this is a huge victory. I'd rather celebrate it, than belittle it.

Let's just be cheerful that the god she believes in, the god that probably wouldn't be on her side on this, is almost definitely not real.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 19:10:45 UTC | #522138

HolyPinkUnicorn's Avatar Comment 23 by HolyPinkUnicorn

I have always distrusted dress codes, and here's another good reason for doing so.

This isn't exclusive to Muslims, many Christians 'expect' (i.e. force) women to wear dresses or long skirts for modesty/conformity reasons. There are even places that require women to do so. For example, the conservative Christian Bob Jones University has a dress code that requires women to wear long skirts or dresses when in class, as part of a dress code that applies "the principles of modesty, gender distinction, appropriateness and distinction from the world." There may be a modicum of choice in attending a private school but that's still very restrictive for 2010 America.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 19:19:39 UTC | #522144

Carney's Avatar Comment 24 by Carney

Obviously, the burka is abhorrent and those who seek to threaten non-wearers are to be condemned.

I'm depressed, however, that the garment she chose to make her stand on was blue jeans. In my view, just about as dreary and boring as the burka itself. Their ubiquity and drabness recalls the Mao suit more than anything else.

Why not a pretty dress instead?

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 19:28:31 UTC | #522152

Carney's Avatar Comment 25 by Carney

Comment 23 by HolyPinkUnicorn :

I have always distrusted dress codes, and here's another good reason for doing so.

This isn't exclusive to Muslims, many Christians 'expect' (i.e. force) women to wear dresses or long skirts for modesty/conformity reasons. There are even places that require women to do so. For example, the conservative Christian Bob Jones University has a dress code that requires women to wear long skirts or dresses when in class, as part of a dress code that applies "the principles of modesty, gender distinction, appropriateness and distinction from the world." There may be a modicum of choice in attending a private school but that's still very restrictive for 2010 America.

I'd be careful about using the word "force". It's over-used, and as with this story, REAL examples of force exist elsewhere. Social and cultural pressure is a very different thing than a climate of fear of assault or death. Ordinary American teenagers deviating from the uniform of blue jeans and flip-flops/sneakers face social pressures no less pervasive and acute than Bob Jones students, the Amish, etc.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 19:32:59 UTC | #522154

JS24's Avatar Comment 26 by JS24

I too would like to offer support for Ms. Khasi.

This article is more proof why education of women is so important. Not all will chose to give up the full covering, but maybe some will or atleast gain some autonomy. These women are so subjugated it is heartbreaking.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 19:40:27 UTC | #522161

repeteor's Avatar Comment 27 by repeteor

Is there an narrator in the house?

I am producing a film/doc starting next year and in great need of a voluntary narrator. For more info please mail me morphelly(AT)hotmail.com

Regards

Pete

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 21:41:43 UTC | #522235

jon_the_d's Avatar Comment 28 by jon_the_d

What gets me the most, is how some backward, uneducated moron (most likely) is willing to kill a bright, hard working, university educated young woman who will be an asset to their society, simply for not dressing a particular way.

The amateur psychologist in me is saying that such men HATE to see women being smarter, and more successful than they are, and daring to be independent.

I hope this doesn't end badly for her, we all know how easy an acid attack can be to carry out...

I really hope the police can do their job well enough in this case, and I hope the police as a whole severely crack down on this PFI and any other militant islamic organizations threatening women's freedoms.

Mon, 20 Sep 2010 23:28:13 UTC | #522332

Stella's Avatar Comment 29 by Stella

"It's better to live fearlessly for an hour than to serve such people for 100 years," she says.

Rayana R Khazi is my hero.

Tue, 21 Sep 2010 01:38:08 UTC | #522392

Stella's Avatar Comment 30 by Stella

Also, Carney?

Are you serious?

Women exist for ourselves, not as decorative objects. We are under no obligation to be either modest or "pretty."

Believe it or not, many women find pants more comfortable and appropriate to their lives than "pretty dresses."

Ugh. Even here. Puke.

Tue, 21 Sep 2010 01:43:12 UTC | #522393