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← Toward Making the Blind See: Gene Therapy Restores Vision in Mice

Toward Making the Blind See: Gene Therapy Restores Vision in Mice - Comments

InYourFaceNewYorker's Avatar Comment 1 by InYourFaceNewYorker

Don't they need Jebus to heal the blind?? ;) Anyway, cool article!

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 15:17:00 UTC | #457516

Chris Roberts's Avatar Comment 2 by Chris Roberts

Awesome.

The power of scientific dicovery will always outstrip our imaginations.

I hope that one day this technique will be applied to human medicine, instead of the false promise of early gene therepy trials.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 15:21:00 UTC | #457520

Bernard Hurley's Avatar Comment 3 by Bernard Hurley

Comment #478124 by InYourFaceNewYorker

Don't they need Jebus to heal the blind??


Oh he does, it's just that you have to use the nanoparticles first to show you are serious about it.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 16:24:00 UTC | #457550

Dr. Strangegod's Avatar Comment 4 by Dr. Strangegod

Now if they could only fix deafness, I wouldn't feel so bad about leaving my earplugs out at that Acid Mothers Temple show the other night. (What? I wanted to hear the subtleties!)

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 16:26:00 UTC | #457552

Bonzai's Avatar Comment 5 by Bonzai

Hmmm..If you are blind all your life and then your vision is suddenly restored it must be very confusing.

I wonder if long deaf people can suddenly hear, would they find the noise unbearable.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 16:28:00 UTC | #457553

LaurieB's Avatar Comment 6 by LaurieB

Bonzai,

You might be interested in reading a book titled:

Crashing Through, A True Story of Risk, Adventure and the Man Who Dared To See.

The author is Robert Kurson. It's about Mike May who lost his sight at three years old and then had his sight restored as an adult. There are very few cases of such a thing and the few cases from the past went very badly. The patients did quite poorly in adjusting to their newly regained sight.

It's absolutely facinating to read about Mike May's conversion from perception of the world as a blind person to perception of the world as a sighted one.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 17:03:00 UTC | #457561

Bernard Hurley's Avatar Comment 7 by Bernard Hurley

Comment #478169 by LaurieB

The patients did quite poorly in adjusting to their newly regained sight.


This makes it difficult to know how to treat blind people. If indeed a cure for certain types of blindness, then I suppose the only thing to do is to offer the treatment but to be honest about the problems people have had. Hopefully, if such treatments become widespread, we will learn how to help with these problems.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 18:51:00 UTC | #457603

glenister_m's Avatar Comment 8 by glenister_m

Re: Comment #478161 by Bonzai on April 9, 2010 at 5:28 pm

"Hmmm..If you are blind all your life and then your vision is suddenly restored it must be very confusing.

I wonder if long deaf people can suddenly hear, would they find the noise unbearable. "

Unfortunately for Stevie Wonder, etc. if you have been blind since birth then the visual center in your brain cannot process images, so aside from seeing colour you wouldn't be able to make sense of the visual information and can find it overwhelming. Mike May had vision at the critical time (before 1 year old) so his brain's visual center is perfectly functional.

Hearing on the other hand is simpler, and doesn't require the same level of processing as images. So deaf people who have had ear damage repaired/corrected don't have the same problem, and can enjoy hearing.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 19:02:00 UTC | #457606

Duff's Avatar Comment 9 by Duff

Damn! Those blasted scientists beat god to the punch yet again! Oh...I'm sorry. It was god who inspired the scientists. I'm so slow when it comes to religion.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 19:16:00 UTC | #457610

DeusExNihilum's Avatar Comment 10 by DeusExNihilum

"There is no cure"

Yet, it seems. Science does it again, and again, and again.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 19:33:00 UTC | #457616

Frankus1122's Avatar Comment 11 by Frankus1122

Scientists were forced to work on this problem because, well frankly, Jesus has been a bit lax in the old 'making-the-blind-see' department lately.

I see this as an example of how science allows for real 'miracles', except there is no magic involved, only science. Cures like this come about as the result of hard work and the rejection of magic ideas.

Reality trumps religious belief.

God can't heal amputees, nor can he cure blindness.
Prayers do not cure cancer.
Holy water will not cure heart disease.

Science, our human understanding of how the universe works, allows us to solve problems and come up with real solutions. Imagine what we could do if the money poured into institutions like the Catholic Church was to be spent on something really worthwhile.

Fri, 09 Apr 2010 23:21:00 UTC | #457661

Styrer-'s Avatar Comment 12 by Styrer-

This is wonderful news. Surely there can be no irrational argument put forward denouncing this real and tangible measure of benefit science has been able to achieve.

A relative of mine had one of his eyes shot out at the age of eight by a children's shooting arrow device and so this particular avenue of science would seem blocked to him, unfortunately.

One has heard, however, of the immense strides scientists have been able to make in embryonic stem cell research, which claims to be able to replicate the cells of any and every part of the human body. This line of research would seem to offer more hope of benefit to those whose ocular capacity is forever gone than to those who are suffering the pain and horror of retinitis pigmentosa. Unfortunately, there is for these people a great deal of irrational antipathy for such treatment, based mostly in the tenets of what is called a 'faith' of one sort or another, thereby bringing a virtual halt to such research in those countries where the most gifted would be most likely to shine a curative light on the problem.

My father is 65 now and I wonder if I will ever have the pleasure of looking into his eyes and knowing that he sees me, and the world around him, twice as vividly, because of the unfettered advances of science, than he ever has been able to do in the last 57 years.

Sean Tyrer

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 01:09:00 UTC | #457678

gumby gumby's Avatar Comment 13 by gumby gumby

What remains now is to turn water into wine, walking on the water, make a dead man back to life and a few more things.

Then science will be Jesus.

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 02:11:00 UTC | #457682

Styrer-'s Avatar Comment 14 by Styrer-

Comment #478292 by Otávio Magnani on April 10, 2010 at 3:11 am

With baited breath, I really must ask: the few more things, please?

You do a very gifted impression of someone who hasn't the faintest idea of what they are talking about. Quite like you so far, you cheeky little chap. Keep it up.

Sean Tyrer

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 04:02:00 UTC | #457690

sundiver's Avatar Comment 15 by sundiver

Otavio: You mean like the bread and fishies thingy? Or covering the planet with 10 kilometers of water in 40 days ( I know that wasn't one of JC's tricks but it's still one the more ridiculous things in the Bible ). BTW, I hope I misread your profile. If you're 13 you're one helluva lot brighter than I was. Or am.

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 09:12:00 UTC | #457723

gumby gumby's Avatar Comment 16 by gumby gumby

Comment #478335 by sundiver on April 10, 2010 at 10:12 am

Yes, I was thinking about the bread and fishes thing.

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 11:22:00 UTC | #457741

Frankus1122's Avatar Comment 17 by Frankus1122

Walking on water is easy.
I've seen David Blaine do it.
I do it every winter.

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 12:20:00 UTC | #457753

kantastisk's Avatar Comment 18 by kantastisk

I just love how they supply an unedited picture to demonstrate what normal vision looks like.

Sat, 10 Apr 2010 19:03:00 UTC | #457816