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← Will Christians swing the 2010 UK election?

Will Christians swing the 2010 UK election? - Comments

Mr-discovery's Avatar Comment 1 by Mr-discovery

does any know which party is supporting science research,renewable energy and generality being a clear thinker ?

im new to the politics but i wish to vote this time round.

so i guess what im asking is which one party is thinking about the long term goals for the world?

and not petite day to day crap

also anyone know a good link to see a overview of there goals..

also would be nice to hear Dawkins,and the other top dogs to give there opinion on what would be the right choice and there reasons for saying that .?

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:14:00 UTC | #461482

jel's Avatar Comment 2 by jel

answer=no.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:23:00 UTC | #461491

Mr-discovery's Avatar Comment 3 by Mr-discovery

thanks ........... your such a great help there you might as well not exist

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:26:00 UTC | #461492

rod-the-farmer's Avatar Comment 4 by rod-the-farmer

I doubt very much Richard would recommend voting for a particular political party. But I have been wrong before.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:42:00 UTC | #461494

Mr-discovery's Avatar Comment 5 by Mr-discovery

well really i just want to know from a well educated and non-religious point of view.

from a rational and reason based view.

so far i cant see or find this.....why...

everyone's views so far is all about what they will see in there life time and not views about what is best for human kind to progress...

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:50:00 UTC | #461495

Pete.K's Avatar Comment 6 by Pete.K

does any know which party is supporting science research,renewable energy and generality being a clear thinker ?

im new to the politics but i wish to vote this time round.

so i guess what im asking is which one party is thinking about the long term goals for the world?

and not petite day to day crap

also anyone know a good link to see a overview of there goals..

also would be nice to hear Dawkins,and the other top dogs to give there opinion on what would be the right choice and there reasons for saying that .?


Try the Lid Dems and their spokesman Dr Evan Harris, MP for oxford.

The problem with UK politics is that it has become a two party battle, you either vote for the workers party (Ha! Tony Blair wouldn't know what work was if it hit him in the face.) or the bosses party, which is utter bollocks, most Tory MP's wouldn't know a VAT return if it hit them in the face.

At least the Liberals have no allegiance to either cause, and the old argument that they have no experience of governing is more bollocks, the current government have been in office for years and look at the mess they made of it.

If you have an independent MP standing, I would consider them, at least they act for the constituency and not the party line.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:52:00 UTC | #461496

paulifa1's Avatar Comment 7 by paulifa1

Also Nick Clegg doesn't believe in God, so thats a good start!!

You'll not get any long term thinking from any of the UK party's though, they all think in 4 year chunks.

What we really need is a Carl Sagan type in power, fat chance of that ever happening I'm afraid...

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:53:00 UTC | #461497

SaganTheCat's Avatar Comment 8 by SaganTheCat

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 12:57:00 UTC | #461498

Cartomancer's Avatar Comment 9 by Cartomancer

Fortunately there are large numbers of people in this country committed to opposing the insidious creep of christian and similar religious immorality. The gay community springs immediately to mind - a much better organised, more vocal, and more popular minority than the religious (and even Chris Grayling knows it, as we can see from his frantic back-pedalling!). The problem with openly supporting an overtly "christian" take on moral issues in this country is that it turns off far more people than it turns on - because the only issues on which there is a distinctively "christian" take are issues on which the majority of people are strongly against that take.

Pretty much everyone wants better schools, better healthcare provision, better policing, better community cohesion, a fairer justice system and so forth. The only issues on which the religious differ from the majority of the population are things like gay marriage and faith schools - i.e. the perpetuation of social discrimination and division. And even most of the only mildly religious are against such things, in line with the majority opinion.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 13:05:00 UTC | #461501

Mr-discovery's Avatar Comment 10 by Mr-discovery

ty i knew i could count on you guys come out with useful comments.

will properly sign up to that http://geekthevote.org.uk/

after i read more about it later tonight.

i think whats really important is show and have your self added to the number of supporters as it seems the party's tend to support ideas that the will get them the most votes...:P

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 13:11:00 UTC | #461505

God fearing Atheist's Avatar Comment 11 by God fearing Atheist

It would therefore appear to be the duty of UK atheists to make it clear to MPs that we also have a vote.

In my case, it does not necessarily mean I will always vote in opposition to a religious person. For instance, the issue of MPs caught with their fingers in the till. But in other cases - e.g. abortion or euthanasia, I am likely to vote in the opposite direction.

If an MP sucks up to too much to the most religious 10% of voters, let us make it clear they will lose the support of the most atheistic 10% and hence gain nothing.

However, it has been quipped that the Church of England is the Tory party at prayer, so I suspect there is already a correlation: Tory==Christian, Labour==atheist. But then why is Labour so keen of faith schools? If atheists are part of their core constituency, we need to be more vocal.

EDIT: Running through the article is the assumption/presumption that religious==moral, and the implication of the opposite: atheist==immoral.
This would appear to be one of the most important issues in the atheism vrs. theism debate, if not the most important. Theists insist morality comes from god, and a rejection of god is a rejection of the moral compass. Atheists, on the other hand, see religious "morality" as being at least a thousand years out of date.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 13:15:00 UTC | #461507

DeepFritz's Avatar Comment 12 by DeepFritz

In Australia, there is a sharpish divide...

The Liberal party (in reality the tories under the wrong name) are full of Protestants. The Labor party has a large contingent of Irish descent (catholics) and a few atheists and agnostics.

In general I wouldn't concern myself with the faith of an MP that I was going to elect, I would look much more broadly than that. Also learn to read between the lines.

When the tories say things like Tax Reform is needed, then what they are really saying is that they want to reduce the tax level people who get paid large salaries should have to pay less tax. Increasing border security means "Prevent the brown people and the refugees from legally entering the country." Family values (I think we all know the meaning here). I could go on...
Learn about the missions of each of the political parties and also try to get active and talk about what is important with your friends and family. Also think about who you are voting for and why. The only thing that I don't like about the British voting (first past the post) is that it can possibly sway your vote to ensure that the wrong lizard doesn't get elected, rather than ensuring that the right one gets in.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 13:43:00 UTC | #461513

COD's Avatar Comment 13 by COD

Since seeing Nick stating that Christian values are central to his policies and seeing him jump of the God bandwagon: the Libs no longer have my vote.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 14:15:00 UTC | #461518

SaganTheCat's Avatar Comment 14 by SaganTheCat

Labour==atheist. But then why is Labour so keen of faith schools£


that's never been the case as far as I know, atheist i know tend to have liberal views but let's not forget Labour was headed by the secret catholic when they supported funding faith schools

either way it's the tories who seem to me to have the most xtian influence right now. i certainly don't support their plans to bribe people into marriage

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 14:26:00 UTC | #461521

LWS's Avatar Comment 15 by LWS

UK election info:

Mr. Nick Clegg of the Liberal-Democrats came out as the best speaker at the TV debate last week.

Mr. Clegg has a bit of a problem though, he came out as an Atheist:

"Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrats’ new leader, has defied political convention with a frank admission that he is an atheist.

During a round of media broadcasts on the morning after his election to the post, he was asked by one interviewer: “Do you believe in God?”

“No,” Mr Clegg answered simply, during an appearance on BBC Radio 5 Live. "

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/faith/article3074541.ece

Clegg let's the side down by bowing to his RC wife and sending his kids for religious indoctrination.

"Nick Clegg's atheism would rule him out of office in America, Iran" (& most nations)

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/adrianmichaels/100035538/nick-cleggs-atheism-would-rule-him-out-of-office-in-america-iran/

re: Science

Nick Clegg calls for reform of libel laws in speech to Royal Society

http://bengoldacre.posterous.com/nick-clegg-calls-for-reform-of-libel-laws-in

How does a person cope with an intimate partner who is also active in religion? That can't make for a happy home life.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 14:42:00 UTC | #461524

Nozzer's Avatar Comment 16 by Nozzer

I loved the quotation from the Christian Party leader "We could say to our rivals 'A plague on both your houses'. We could say 'A plague on one house or another'..." not very nice (Christian?).

It might be useful to remind candidates about the growing number of people without affiliation to any religion in the UK.

I shudder at the thought of religion playing a major part in UK politics.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 14:44:00 UTC | #461525

The Plc's Avatar Comment 17 by The Plc

Only across the water, the people of Britain have been given the perfect historical experiment of what happens when religion and politics explosively collide.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 15:19:00 UTC | #461544

bluebird's Avatar Comment 18 by bluebird

For us interested Yanks watching from the sidelines, C-SPAN is broadcasting the debates of the candidates:

http://www.c-span.org/Series/Prime-Minister-Questions.aspx

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 15:21:00 UTC | #461545

No Quarter's Avatar Comment 19 by No Quarter

No, they'll just vote Tory like they did at the last election.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 15:50:00 UTC | #461558

jel's Avatar Comment 20 by jel

3. Comment #482242 by Mr-discovery on April 21, 2010 at 1:26 pm
thanks ........... your such a great help there you might as well not exist

sorry Mr-discovery, I was actually answering the question posed in the headline, "Will Christians swing the 2010 UK election" so I replied
2. Comment #482241 by jel on April 21, 2010 at 1:23 pm
answer=no.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 15:54:00 UTC | #461560

Cosmicshore's Avatar Comment 21 by Cosmicshore

Politics cannot be taken seriously when religion rides in the same wagon. This is the 21st century, and we should be losing the shackles of religion, not trying to find a way to wear them a bit looser. Christians have the same rights as non-religious people – the only rights Christians want is to impose their crude and strange beliefs on others. Give them recognition and a voice now, and they want more later - until they have a level of control. No thanks, keep the church separate from the government.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 16:08:00 UTC | #461565

Mr-discovery's Avatar Comment 22 by Mr-discovery

at jel : ahh ok lol sorry for the sarcasm

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 16:13:00 UTC | #461568

Ivan The Not So Bad's Avatar Comment 23 by Ivan The Not So Bad

In this link, the cuddly religious folk at Ekklesia dispute the assertion that the religious will vote en mass for a particular party:

http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/11911

And in this link Chris Cook, a leader writer at the Financial Times, asks if the UK Conservative party is the subject of a Christian insurgency:

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/12400596-16ac-11df-aa09-00144feab49a.html

Whatever the truth of this, it is certainly the case that climate change denial, anti-gay and anti-abortion opinion and pro-christian values are already most prevalent in the Conservatives and in their core Telegraph and Mail reading supporters.

And don't forget that stated Conservative policy would vastly increase the number of faith schools, keep the bishops in an unreformed House of Lords, curtail the BBC and get rid of the broadcast media impartiality rules so allowing Rupert Murdoch's SKY to become our very own FOX News.

Be afraid.

And vote tactically to try and keep the Conservatives out.

That done, spend an interesting next twelve months keeping an eye on Nick Clegg (the non-believing current leader of the Liberal Democrats) and David Milliband (the non-believing most likely next leader of the Labour Party).

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 18:26:00 UTC | #461595

Dr. Strangegod's Avatar Comment 24 by Dr. Strangegod

"Corporal Clegg, 'e 'ad a wooden le-eg!"

(sorry)

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 18:42:00 UTC | #461601

Stonyground's Avatar Comment 25 by Stonyground

Any party that tries to suck up to the religious instantly loses my vote and that lack of my vote is completely non-negotiable. If Clegg is an atheist well good for him but a vote for him runs the risk of him doing a deal to keep the loathsome toad Brown in power for another five years.

Some of those here may find this interesting.

www.skeptical-voter.org

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 19:32:00 UTC | #461618

Zenozzograte's Avatar Comment 26 by Zenozzograte

Comment #482268 by COD on April 21, 2010 at 3:15 pm
Since seeing Nick stating that Christian values are central to his policies and seeing him jump of the God bandwagon: the Libs no longer have my vote.


You should tell him and his cronies. Otherwise you may as well be talking to yourself.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 19:39:00 UTC | #461621

mjwemdee's Avatar Comment 27 by mjwemdee

If this country gets in a mess (and it frequently does) as a member of the electorate I would expect my government and its ministers to seek solutions through reason, not through prayer.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 20:17:00 UTC | #461632

mjwemdee's Avatar Comment 28 by mjwemdee

Comment #482232 by Mr-discovery

does any know which party is supporting science research,renewable energy and generality being a clear thinker ?

I myself will be voting Lib Dem, because we must do something about political reform and neither Labour nor Conservatives will do anything as the status quo suits them very well.
But regarding science: I seem to recall reading a letter recently published (in the Independent, I think) by a committee of renowned scientists and technology experts who have sounded the alarm about support and funding for investment and education. Their take was that Labour was the most interested and science-oriented, whereas the silence from the Conservative party was deafening. Can anyone supply a link to this?

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 20:31:00 UTC | #461634

jonjermey's Avatar Comment 29 by jonjermey

Of course politicians should act in their own self-interest. And they should be bright and enlightened enough to realise that their own self-interest rests on benefiting as many of their constituents as possible, and that the best way to do this is rational decision-making based on evidence. Self-interest is like democracy; it's a terrible way to do things, but it's better than anything else that we have.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 20:31:00 UTC | #461635

the great teapot's Avatar Comment 30 by the great teapot

I don't think COD should tell them, I think they should tell us what they really think without adjusting their own spin to fit what they think will win votes.
How the hell can we trust anyone who canges their belief in fairy tales just to win more votes.

Wed, 21 Apr 2010 21:08:00 UTC | #461641