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← Monkeys 'display self-doubt' like humans

Monkeys 'display self-doubt' like humans - Comments

Narvi's Avatar Comment 1 by Narvi

It really makes you wonder what else we consider uniquely human, isn't.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 15:18:21 UTC | #595450

zengardener's Avatar Comment 2 by zengardener

Game theory is very old indeed.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 15:19:22 UTC | #595452

PhilipK's Avatar Comment 3 by PhilipK

Comment 1 by Narvi :

It really makes you wonder what else we consider uniquely human, isn't.

Very few things are uniquely human, I imagine. Why would they be, after all? With animals that share about 98% of our DNA, one would expect little difference on a deep level.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 16:40:38 UTC | #595504

Hendrix is my gOD's Avatar Comment 4 by Hendrix is my gOD

Now if only creationists could posses self-doubt. Perhaps this proves they are less human than the monkeys.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 16:53:31 UTC | #595510

irate_atheist's Avatar Comment 5 by irate_atheist

Are they sure?

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 17:19:00 UTC | #595525

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 6 by Peter Grant

Comment 4 by Hendrix is my gOD

Now if only creationists could posses self-doubt. Perhaps this proves they are less human than the monkeys.

Spot on, the monkeys at least know enough to know when they don't know. :D

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 17:32:52 UTC | #595537

Matt B's Avatar Comment 7 by Matt B

Comment 4 by Hendrix is my gOD

Now if only creationists could posses self-doubt. Perhaps this proves they are less human than the monkeys.

Unfortunately, self-doubt seems to be a sign of intelligence. Creationists remind me of the sort-of mind blowing concept of the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 17:35:02 UTC | #595540

susanlatimer's Avatar Comment 8 by susanlatimer

It's always struck me that people who insist they're not related to monkeys are completely ignorant about, among other things, monkeys. It would be nice if they took the time to find out a little something about our fellow primates.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 18:26:54 UTC | #595572

Hendrix is my gOD's Avatar Comment 9 by Hendrix is my gOD

Comment 7 by Matt B

Unfortunately, self-doubt seems to be a sign of intelligence. Creationists remind me of the sort-of mind blowing concept of the Dunning-Kruger effect.

I followed your link to the Dunning-Kruger effect. Yea, its so true. I used to joke with my friends: "You're to stupid to know you're stupid!"

This leads to the situation in which less competent people rate their own ability higher than more competent people.

This would be the situation of the workplace for anyone whose ever had a boss.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 18:29:17 UTC | #595574

Ivan The Not So Bad's Avatar Comment 10 by Ivan The Not So Bad

Comment 5 by irate_atheist

Are they sure?

I don't know.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 19:55:18 UTC | #595639

Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 11 by Neodarwinian

I wonder what a behaviorist would make of this? Conditioning? What kind of controls here?

I think the capuchins serve as a good control, as conditioning would affect them also and apparently the third option does not occur to them.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 20:26:46 UTC | #595656

raytoman's Avatar Comment 12 by raytoman

Monkeys are one of earths sentient species.

They are perhaps a bit behind apes in terms of evolution so we should perhaps look for the evolution of intelligence in Ape Species (except for the Homo Sapiens Sapiens ape of course which invented religion and is regressing - it is unlikely to ever raise above sentience, unless we change the ratio of athiests to religious people, currently 1 in 40).

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 21:39:47 UTC | #595693

holysmokes's Avatar Comment 13 by holysmokes

I know a few monkeys who want to; If monkeys evolved from man, how come there are still men?

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 21:57:25 UTC | #595709

Hendrix is my gOD's Avatar Comment 14 by Hendrix is my gOD

Comment 12 by raytoman

Monkeys are one of earths sentient species.

They are perhaps a bit behind apes in terms of evolution so we should perhaps look for the evolution of intelligence in Ape Species (except for the Homo Sapiens Sapiens ape of course which invented religion and is regressing - it is unlikely to ever raise above sentience, unless we change the ratio of athiests to religious people, currently 1 in 40).

We could teach evolution to the apes. Then survival of the fittest would fix that ratio.

Thu, 24 Feb 2011 22:27:37 UTC | #595719

PERSON's Avatar Comment 15 by PERSON

Comment 10 by Ivan The Not So Bad

You seem very certain of that. I think (etc)

IMO certainty isn't an inherent thing, far from it, and I think where it does occur in an individual it's a product of other factors within their personality. That's why faith needs to be talked up so much, and regular, repetitive programming sessions are mandated and enforced using social pressure and coercion. Inflexibility means death over a sufficiently long period.

As I understand it, incompetents are not more certain exactly, more that they tend to over-estimate their ability. The cause and effect of that are unclear: if you can't gauge your ability because you are insufficiently critical or perceptive, I'd think it would make it hard to improve. Then again, some (most?) people just respond to the assessments of their peers.

Comment 13 by holysmokes

That could be a good come back, potentially "I totally agree. Clearly that is right. And if creationists came from humans... how are there still humans?"

Fri, 25 Feb 2011 13:52:17 UTC | #596012

cheesedoff17's Avatar Comment 16 by cheesedoff17

Does "Old World" monkey mean that they evolved earlier than "New World" monkeys?

Fri, 25 Feb 2011 16:11:24 UTC | #596062