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← Godless in Tumourville: Christopher Hitchens interview

Godless in Tumourville: Christopher Hitchens interview - Comments

AfraidToDie's Avatar Comment 1 by AfraidToDie

I live his quote:

'To the dumb question, “Why me?” the cosmos barely bothers to return the reply, “Why not?”

I can only hope his fight against the irrational will continue for years to come!!!

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:48:47 UTC | #607355

BowDownToGizmo's Avatar Comment 2 by BowDownToGizmo

Comment 1 by AfraidToDie :

I live his quote:

'To the dumb question, “Why me?” the cosmos barely bothers to return the reply, “Why not?” I can only hope his fight against the irrational will continue for years to come!!!

Ah you beat me to it, I can only hope my dark humour matches his when I'm near my end, cracks me up every time.

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:57:15 UTC | #607357

SomersetJohn's Avatar Comment 3 by SomersetJohn

Hitchens is one of those rare people who, at his worst, is still better than nearly everyone else.

Here's hoping that science advances fast enough to do him some good.

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 13:20:33 UTC | #607380

biorays's Avatar Comment 4 by biorays

'I felt sorry for him,’ Hitchens says now. 'He seemed like an innocent of some sort, bodyguarded by.... opinions. Pessimistic, unlucky, badly treated ...... He said to my mother once that she was the only luck he’d ever had. He was trying to stop her leaving. And it did make her pause for a bit.’

To see a potential role model live as if bereaved of their aspirations and ambitions - dreams even - reminds my emotions of the mental anguish, say, a religious person is constrained by due the parameters their dogma imposes, deceiving them till they are beholden to a negation of that which all their being might wish and desire to live for.

Maybe this is what Christopher alludes to in part:

'With religion, try as I may, I can’t think myself into the viewpoint of the faithful.'

Which I must say is a cumulatively oppressed position due an alliance of speculative falsehoods and de facto absence of alternatives, the restrictions of which set the mind into an adaptation of fictional alternatives it then considers existential, but which nevertheless the body is generally more than a little 'disagreeable' of - but there isn't the field in which to run, or at least not one even slightly accessible into which to escape. The emotions, and mind, now beaten, default to their cage all too readily - an enforced microcosm of the life into which they were potentially born!

And it is the escaping from this trench of thoughts and emotions that I long lived blindly, days (I lie! Years, but who would believe me?) perplexed and defeated, as to how my mind got there and, much more vividly, the darkness upon the pathway out of it, so that in spite of my growing diet of reason forging me a crutch upon which to lean, took Christophers maverick maulings of anything born of speculation to register my emotions alongside my intellect, finally. It was late for me, but as he suggests, a gross kindness that he was all to unaware of.

So when Susan Sontag suggests him,

'a sovereign figure in the small world of those who tilled the field of ideas’,

she beautifully, almost poetically, beholds his position in respect of those delivered, by his form and discourse, from that consciousness that would have had it readily circumcised.

For me Hitchens not only took the lid of religion and poured it out for all to see, but has also showed us what it is to not have it at all and how much better this would be. No psychologist could come close to this. No parent or friend could rise to such a wall of opposition in the head and in the heart. But for me, Hitchens simply cast it aside in more ways than I can fathom. An artisan - a messiah of reason - what else could pose such a role - it is become more, much more, than the man that he is - unquestionable!

And when he remarks,

'the newspapers would come out and they wouldn’t be there to read them.'

I say, and how - since when has a newspaper been lived out in the lives of those during and after ones passing in ways unpublished and unwritten, but so much the better for having accessed their own lives through the reason of someone, chancing upon a star, who rose above all of them claimed in the East, to be delivering us from dogma and oppression?

Of death:

He pauses. 'It is a disagreeable thought.’

But then that is the seed of poison that led so many of us into the mire of dogma which you so articulately deciphered, sir!

What more good could you have yourself do? I doubt if you could have managed it had you not lived the life you have?

More people than you will ever know, probably imagine, have already said yes - to that which carries beyond ones own experiences - and so it will go that their hearts beat on in like manner. In this respect you transcend your own form - of that you are a master! I thank you and thank you again and in behalf of those you will never meet, nor I, for the doctrine you inspired in a style so unique that people do truly feel awe in witness of it and moreover are liberated by it in ways which will change lives for who can say how long?

May you live long!

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 13:57:10 UTC | #607389

MilitantNonStampCollector's Avatar Comment 5 by MilitantNonStampCollector

Comment 3 by SomersetJohn :

Hitchens is one of those rare people who, at his worst, is still better than nearly everyone else,


I raise an eyebrow when I hear that kind of sycophantic thing. Can't we just say he is a great intellect who speaks the truth and leave it at that without putting him up on a pedestal? Is it really necessary to say he is better than nearly everybody else?

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 14:54:05 UTC | #607410

Vaal's Avatar Comment 6 by Vaal

Excellent article, showing Hitchens as vulnerable, human, quick-witted, and still a sharp intellect, despite a debilitating illness.

Very fair interview, with only one puerile dig at Hitchens “subconscious hostility to the church due to his mothers suicide.” Makes a pleasant change to see an interview without the vacuous canard of “Strident” thrown in by lazy, churlish hacks.

He has a fondness for cathedrals – preferably Anglican ones. 'I’m a Protestant atheist.’

I am a Protestant atheist too! LOL.

People stop him on the street and tell him they are fans. 'I always say, don’t be a fan, be a critical reader

Precisely, and that is the message that is most important in this article, and why people are fans.

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 16:17:42 UTC | #607454

mjwemdee's Avatar Comment 7 by mjwemdee

A lovely article, candid and thought-provoking. We're all rooting for you, Hitch.

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 17:21:41 UTC | #607478

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 8 by Peter Grant

Comment 5 by Derek M

Comment 3 by SomersetJohn :

Hitchens is one of those rare people who, at his worst, is still better than nearly everyone else,

I raise an eyebrow when I hear that kind of sycophantic thing. Can't we just say he is a great intellect who speaks the truth and leave it at that without putting him up on a pedestal? Is it really necessary to say he is better than nearly everybody else?

I think it would be fair to say that Hitchens is a superior human being, not that this really says all that much but I think it's fair to give credit where credit is due.

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 20:31:27 UTC | #607577

jbyrd's Avatar Comment 9 by jbyrd

Comment 3 by SomersetJohn :

Hitchens is one of those rare people who, at his worst, is still better than nearly everyone else.

Here's hoping that science advances fast enough to do him some good.

I was unaware he was jesus.

Sat, 26 Mar 2011 23:06:49 UTC | #607670

Charisma's Avatar Comment 10 by Charisma

I love articles like these. It was published yesterday (March 25th) so it's good to know he's okay. Gaining some weight and growing back hair and all of that.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 02:07:03 UTC | #607736

quarecuss's Avatar Comment 11 by quarecuss

I sent this CH piece to an investment banker whom I know a little and whose neo-conservative ideas get right up my left nostril and my left everything. He said he enjoyed it and thought he'd now read Hitch 22. I see CH as the bridge-builder between the political left and the political right, and it is his atheism that is the first principle upon which that bridge can and must be built if it is to span the gap.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 03:31:01 UTC | #607763

MilitantNonStampCollector's Avatar Comment 12 by MilitantNonStampCollector

Comment 10 by Charisma :

I love articles like these. It was published yesterday (March 25th) so it's good to know he's okay. Gaining some weight and growing back hair and all of that.


No. That picture is about a year old.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 03:37:25 UTC | #607766

erindorothy's Avatar Comment 13 by erindorothy

Excellent article. I do hope the 'experiment' is very successful. Do not want to lose him yet.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 04:10:42 UTC | #607772

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 14 by Peter Grant

jbyrd's Avatar Comment 9 by jbyrd

I was unaware he was jesus.

Please, don't insult the Hitch like that.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 08:51:30 UTC | #607814

danconquer's Avatar Comment 15 by danconquer

Comment 11 by quaredunt :

I see CH as the bridge-builder between the political left and the political right, and it is his atheism that is the first principle upon which that bridge can and must be built if it is to span the gap.

Mainstream political parties - especially in Europe - have been falling over each other to hog the supposedly hallowed centre ground... much to the annoyance and irritation of politically and economically literate citizens on both sides of the spectrum who are left cold by the focus-grouped, spin-doctored, tabloid-conscious policy mush that this produces. So what exactly is meant by 'bridge-building' between left and right?

As long as humans continue to have competing ideas and aspirations, I think it's good to encourage each side to clearly and unequivocally state their case within the safe confines provided by a democratic framework. The fundamentally contradictory nature of left/right economic ideology means that any bridge will always be weak and unstable. And I don't think there's anything wrong with that.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 12:54:16 UTC | #607880

flamenco's Avatar Comment 16 by flamenco

Has Hitch ever been bested in a debate? I suppose it depends on what side one is standing but I have seen him in many many debates (youtube etc) and seen no-one lay much of a glove on him.

The only reason I'd like to see that happen is to watch Hitch's reply...

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 16:33:48 UTC | #607952

Stafford Gordon's Avatar Comment 17 by Stafford Gordon

Good.

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 18:58:44 UTC | #607991

DefenderOfReason!'s Avatar Comment 18 by DefenderOfReason!

To lose Hitchens would be a profound loss to the entire world!

I hope you can make it through this Mr. Hitchens!!

Mon, 28 Mar 2011 19:42:51 UTC | #608413

nancynancy's Avatar Comment 19 by nancynancy

Hitch, we send you our love and our strength.

Tue, 29 Mar 2011 01:23:12 UTC | #608533

Charisma's Avatar Comment 20 by Charisma

Comment 12 by Derek M

Comment 10 by Charisma :

I love articles like these. It was published yesterday (March 25th) so it's good to know he's okay. Gaining some weight and growing back hair and all of that.

No. That picture is about a year old.

I wasn't talking about the picture. The article mentions it.

Sun, 03 Apr 2011 16:08:50 UTC | #611321