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← Tennessee antievolution bill passes the House

Tennessee antievolution bill passes the House - Comments

Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 1 by Alan4discussion

The only examples provided of "controversial" theories are "biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, global warming, and human cloning." The sponsor of HB 368, Bill Dunn (R-District 16), claimed that the teaching of "intelligent design" would not be protected by the bill. Its chief lobbyist, David Fowler of the Family Action Council of Tennessee, claimed otherwise in the Chattanoogan (February 21, 2011).

Congratulations. Tennessee is now officially scientifically illiterate. Universities running courses in biosciences, meteorology, climatology or other related sciences, please take note when recruiting educated students who do not need a qualifying foundation course as a prerequisite to beginning graduate studies!

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 21:32:11 UTC | #613053

Pitchguest's Avatar Comment 2 by Pitchguest

Oh, look, another Republican opposing science. Seriously, why do Republicans even bother trying to look impartial on any issue, especially on science and religion, when we know they're as two-faced as the rest? Bollocks to them.

In fact, I wonder why Congress or the higher up Supreme Court hasn't urged their concerns on these issues, as it is not just freedom of religion, as stated in the constitution, but freedom from religion too. Anyway, I say good on those who oppose this bill, and pity to those who advance it.

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 21:32:38 UTC | #613054

MostlyHarmless's Avatar Comment 3 by MostlyHarmless

Alongside creationism I hope they start advancing the 'South Park' theory about the origins of life on Earth, which can be seen in 'Cancelled', episode 1, season 7.

Basically each life form on Earth comes from a different planet and was placed here so that aliens could enjoy an amazing reality TV programme broadcast across the universe.

It makes as much sense to me as creationism, so in reality I feel they are more or less equally valid.

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 21:51:06 UTC | #613062

Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 4 by Neodarwinian

Another fight at the Federal level could be possible here. It would not be the first time and I am willing to bet it will not be the last time.

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 22:05:03 UTC | #613065

CyrusSpitama's Avatar Comment 5 by CyrusSpitama

No doubt the Tennessee House Representatives are all learned physicists and biologists competent enough to make the right decision in regards to this bill. Hooray for ignorance! And willful disavowal!

Thank goodness this nonsense has yet to infect American universities. But . . . . . .

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 22:34:14 UTC | #613068

AfraidToDie's Avatar Comment 6 by AfraidToDie

I am no doubt a liberal, but it makes me wonder how a true monetary conservative can embrace the GOP with all this ignorant bullshit. I can understand fiscal responsibility, not the cutting of programs they are calling for, but even if I was a fiscal conservative, I'd have to change to an independent to get away from all this ignorance and lack of compassion from the large number of right wing idiots. But, that is their problem as I enjoy being a liberal :-)

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 22:37:24 UTC | #613070

davidckahn's Avatar Comment 7 by davidckahn

Comment 1 by Alan4discussion :

The only examples provided of "controversial" theories are "biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, global warming, and human cloning." The sponsor of HB 368, Bill Dunn (R-District 16), claimed that the teaching of "intelligent design" would not be protected by the bill. Its chief lobbyist, David Fowler of the Family Action Council of Tennessee, claimed otherwise in the Chattanoogan (February 21, 2011).

Congratulations. Tennessee is now officially scientifically illiterate. Universities running courses in biosciences, meteorology, climatology or other related sciences, please take note when recruiting educated students who do not need a qualifying foundation course as a prerequisite to beginning graduate studies!

I take issue with this post. I attended high school in Chattanooga, at a conservative Christian school and spent the first 20 years of my life as a Creationist. I broke away from that once I was in college. I'm glad my university didn't see things the same way you do.

Furthermore, even if this bill becomes law, there's simply no way that it will stand up in court.

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 22:55:16 UTC | #613078

Linda Ward's Avatar Comment 8 by Linda Ward

Hillbillies go forth.

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 23:17:52 UTC | #613088

Cents's Avatar Comment 9 by Cents

Re: Comment 8 by Linda Ward

That they go forth and multiply. That's what worries me. Why do all these religious types always have so many kids to brainwash?

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 23:44:02 UTC | #613094

Infrasonic's Avatar Comment 10 by Infrasonic

Congratulations. Tennessee is now officially scientifically illiterate. Universities running courses in biosciences, meteorology, climatology or other related sciences, please take note when recruiting educated students who do not need a qualifying foundation course as a prerequisite to beginning graduate studies!

I take issue with this post. I attended high school in Chattanooga, at a conservative Christian school and spent the first 20 years of my life as a Creationist. I broke away from that once I was in college. I'm glad my university didn't see things the same way you do.

Furthermore, even if this bill becomes law, there's simply no way that it will stand up in court.

I believe the poster was pointing out that universities will now have to find a way to carefully examine prospective graduate students, given the fear that students may now possibly be mislead by primary/secondary school science lessons which examine the "scientific weaknesses" of "controversial" scientific theories.

Thu, 07 Apr 2011 23:57:18 UTC | #613095

DarwinLovesYou's Avatar Comment 11 by DarwinLovesYou

Shudder. Let's hope this idiocy doesn't pass here in Texas. These moronic politicians should stop pretending they know anything about science and go back to fucking their sisters.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 01:37:44 UTC | #613108

rjohn19's Avatar Comment 12 by rjohn19

Linda Ward wroye, "Hillbillies go forth." She forgot to add, "But please don't multiply."

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 03:10:15 UTC | #613127

El Bastardo's Avatar Comment 13 by El Bastardo

Here we go again on the merry-go-round of idiocy.

Creationists reword their nonsense to try and force it into schools, it goes to the courts, gets thrown out for bing unconstitutional, so they go away and think of new words to try to hide the religious agenda behind so they can force it into schools.....

All the while wasting the time these kids should be learning and not to mention the cost to the tax payer.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 03:31:37 UTC | #613133

Starcrash's Avatar Comment 14 by Starcrash

As most of us can guess, gay marriage and marijuana will both become legal in the whole country with time. There's only so many times an issue can be up for a vote before it passes.

And this bill is not likely to be any different. If it just keeps getting argued, our state legislatures will believe that it really is the will of the people and they'll make it the standard. We need to expose the real force behind it: the lobbyists. Does anybody have any idea what the name of the organization(s) is that keeps campaigning for and funding advertisements for this bill?

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 03:42:10 UTC | #613137

aquilacane's Avatar Comment 15 by aquilacane

I have yet to see evidence supporting these supposed controversies. What will they teach?

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 03:45:05 UTC | #613139

alaskansee's Avatar Comment 16 by alaskansee

Agreed Aquilacane, they've taken great care to leave the door open to something that then needs better evidence. Or they could just teach any old crap when the "controversial sciences" are up for discussion, no conclusions just lots of scoffing and laughs.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 04:56:44 UTC | #613158

Rich Wilson's Avatar Comment 17 by Rich Wilson

Anyone talking about Republicans needs to watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdfBrhRJeHw

Stupidity is non-partisan.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 05:33:03 UTC | #613166

Stevehill's Avatar Comment 18 by Stevehill

The short version:

If you want your kids to get an education, get the hell out of Tennessee.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 05:59:08 UTC | #613172

David Millar's Avatar Comment 19 by David Millar

No coverage of the "round Earth versus flat Earth" controversy!?

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 07:33:40 UTC | #613190

G.F.Roddam's Avatar Comment 20 by G.F.Roddam

'Backwoods Tennessee' takes on a whole new meaning!

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 07:45:57 UTC | #613194

Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 21 by Alan4discussion

Comment 7 by davidckahn

Comment 1 by Alan4discussion :

   Congratulations. Tennessee is now officially scientifically illiterate.

Universities running courses in biosciences, meteorology, climatology or other related sciences, please take note when recruiting educated students who do not need a qualifying foundation course as a prerequisite to beginning graduate studies!

I take issue with this post. I attended high school in Chattanooga, at a conservative Christian school and spent the first 20 years of my life as a Creationist. I broke away from that once I was in college. I'm glad my university didn't see things the same way you do.

So you don't see a problem with the de-education of the majority of school kids who do not go to university to study biosciences?? Some of us have supported the teaching of REAL SCIENCE for decades and care about the honesty of information! (Well they're only kids! They won't know if they are being taught dishonest drivel that is worthless! - Looks like creationist morality to me!)

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 09:05:58 UTC | #613205

Metamag's Avatar Comment 22 by Metamag

I was wondering something...

Has anyone ever sent a book on evolution to these legislators that keep popping up in US? Like "Why Evolution Is True" or TGSOE, has anyone ever done that, send books to every single legislator to their home addresses, or has there been made any kind of other effort to engage them and publicly reveal their ignorance in media-efficacious way?

Whenever I hear about this occurrences it always seems like people are taken by surprise with completely predictable events.

NCSE seems especially clueless, notwithstanding their recent pandering to religion.

Personally, I think NCSE is an intellectually bankrupt organization because they keep failing to recognize that religion is the main generator of ignorance and scientific illiteracy, so they never deal with the core problem and are even satisfied if people accept the oxymoronic nonsense of theistic evolution which reveals the fundamental misunderstanding of evolution.

Also, recent studies(posted on this site) show clearly that NCSE is a complete abysmal failure. Of course, that too was completely predictable because they never ever address the core problem that causes scientific illiteracy.

Until we start treating religion for what it is, a superstitious institutionalized nonsense that habitually indoctrinates people, there won't be any kind of progress.

Religion is just another kind of illiteracy that we need to combat, just like we did with the basic kind.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 09:27:22 UTC | #613208

Sample's Avatar Comment 23 by Sample

The State of Tennessee is shaped like a boat. An Ark even. Now things are beginning to make sense.

Mike

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 10:33:35 UTC | #613217

Stefan Udrea's Avatar Comment 24 by Stefan Udrea

Wow, I didn't know that human cloning is a scientific theory. I thought it's a technical problem with moral implications.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 11:09:38 UTC | #613223

Hedgerow's Avatar Comment 25 by Hedgerow

Comment 9 by Cents :

Re: Comment 8 by Linda Ward

That they go forth and multiply. That's what worries me. Why do all these religious types always have so many kids to brainwash?

Religion is a cunning and calculated system designed to perpetuate itself. Rather clever really; it's a shame it triumphs over the honest amongst us though. What a troubled species we are.

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 11:23:10 UTC | #613226

Stafford Gordon's Avatar Comment 26 by Stafford Gordon

"Ignorance is bliss."

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 11:26:19 UTC | #613228

Topher's Avatar Comment 27 by Topher

Why is it again that I'm going to send my daughter to a non-religious private school here?

This seems likely to pass the Tennessee State Senate with no problem, but Governor Haslam, despite being a Republican, might actually veto this. Of the four Republican candidates in the primaries, he was the only one who seemed friendly toward teaching evolution.

Time to get to writing a letter...

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 11:31:52 UTC | #613231

andyseaspray's Avatar Comment 28 by andyseaspray

Comment 18 by Stevehill :

The short version:

If you want your kids to get an education, get the hell out of Tennessee.

Maybe indeed it would be easier for everyone if people who value reason and empirical science would live on the other half and the people who clearly don't would live on the other... I don't see this battle ever ending because it's impossible to reason or argue with the die hard religious people.

I know its impossible to do this kind of experiment in practice for human reasons but nonetheless it would be interesting to see how two societies totally shut from each other would develop if the other one was fundamentally religious and the other one atheistic/agnostic with secular humanists. How long would the 2 societies stay "pure" of the influence of the other even thou they would not know of each other is another question thou. Probably the religious society would create people who would question the old ways and be open to reason and evidence against religion. Would the atheistic society on the other hand spawn a new religion or religions? However I think its quite obvious which one would make the greater progress in science and technology and gain all the benefits provided...

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 12:14:58 UTC | #613241

Timpelstiltskin's Avatar Comment 29 by Timpelstiltskin

Maybe this is why the USA lags behind the rest of the world in its student's academic results. It is becoming too evangelical. Relgion has far too much emphasis. The churches' tax haven is too big. Start taxing the church. That will weed out a few that are in it for the money. Unleash capitalism on the church. That is pure freedom of religion. The freedom to pay tax.

They preach a life of giving while the churches receive and get filthy rich!?! Hypocracy. But hey, faith is blind... so keep paying.

How can a child be encouraged to think freely and investigate if the child goes no further to answer his or her own curiosities with "because god dit it!"? Or maybe that is the point of it. Less questions more obedience.

It ceases to amaze me how the USA is so forward yet backward.

"The mind is like a parachute, if it aint open, it don't work!'- (Frank Zappa)

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 12:45:49 UTC | #613246

rationalmind's Avatar Comment 30 by rationalmind

It sounds as if we have a few trailer park politicians who are vitamin deficient as a result of not eating enough vitamins with their roadkill :-)

Fri, 08 Apr 2011 12:53:00 UTC | #613248