This site is not maintained. Click here for the new website of Richard Dawkins.

OK, climate sceptics: here's the raw data you wanted

Anyone can now view for themselves the raw data that was at the centre of last year's "climategate" scandal.

Temperature records going back 150 years from 5113 weather stations around the world were yesterday released to the public by the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. The only records missing are from 19 stations in Poland, which refused to allow them to be made public.

"We released [the dataset] to dispel the myths that the data have been inappropriately manipulated, and that we are being secretive," says Trevor Davies, the university's pro-vice-chancellor for research. "Some sceptics argue we must have something to hide, and we've released the data to pull the rug out from those who say there isn't evidence that the global temperature is increasing." Hand it over

The university were ordered to release data by the UK Information Commissioner's Office, following a freedom-of-information request for the raw data from researchers Jonathan Jones of the University of Oxford and Don Keiller of Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, UK.

Davies says that the university initially refused on the grounds that the data is not owned by the CRU but by the national meteorological organisations that collect the data and share it with the CRU.

When the CRU's refusal was overruled by the information commissioner, the UK Met Office was recruited to act as a go-between and obtain permission to release all the data.
Read more

TAGGED: EARTH SCIENCES


RELATED CONTENT

Draining of world's aquifers feeds...

Damian Carrington - The Observer 3 Comments

"In the long run, I would still be more concerned about the impact of climate change, but this work shows that even if we stabilise the climate, we might still get sea level rise due to how we use water."

'Ring of fire' eclipse to begin

- - BBC News - Science & Environment 6 Comments

An "annular eclipse" will be visible from a 240 to 300km-wide swathe of Earth stretching from Asia across the Pacific to the western US on Monday.

Arctic melt releasing ancient methane

Richard Black - BBC News - Science &... 6 Comments

Scientists have identified thousands of sites in the Arctic where methane that has been stored for many millennia is bubbling into the atmosphere.

How much water is there on, in, and...

- - USGS Water Science for Schools 27 Comments

'Save the planet', science leaders urge...

Pallab Ghosh - BBC News - Science &... 35 Comments

No Love for Comet Wipeout

Sid Perkins - Science - AAAS.org 8 Comments

Did a comet wipe out woolly mammoths and an ancient Indian culture almost 13,000 years ago? Geologists have fiercely debated the topic since 2007. Now a new study says an extraterrestrial impact wasn't to blame, though the scientists who originally proposed the impact idea still aren't convinced.

MORE

MORE BY ANDY COGHLAN

Violent anti-science anarchists vow to...

Andy Coghlan - NewScientist 26 Comments

Violent anti-science anarchists vow to strike again

Unsafe abortions rise as contraceptive...

Andy Coghlan - NewScientist 14 Comments


Unsafe abortions rise as contraceptive funding is cut

Troy Davis execution highlights witness...

Andy Coghlan - NewScientist 83 Comments

Gene change in cannibals reveals...

Andy Coghlan - NewScientist 20 Comments

Create a back-up copy of your immune...

Andy Coghlan 6 Comments

MORE

Comments

Comment RSS Feed

Please sign in or register to comment