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Seeing Catch-22 Twice - Comments

msbav8r's Avatar Comment 1 by msbav8r

Bad link.

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 21:52:53 UTC | #857165

Michael Appleman's Avatar Comment 2 by Michael Appleman

Does anyone else find it funny that the button to report a problem is labeled "Create problem"? I was actually a little apprehensive about pressing that button, lol.

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 21:56:10 UTC | #857169

mirandaceleste's Avatar Comment 3 by mirandaceleste

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 21:58:25 UTC | #857171

Justicar's Avatar Comment 4 by Justicar

Michael Appleman: mine reads "report a problem"; where are you seeing it read otherwise?

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 22:41:06 UTC | #857188

Justicar's Avatar Comment 5 by Justicar

Nevermind. I found it at the submit problem screen /facepalm

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 22:44:19 UTC | #857191

/Mike's Avatar Comment 6 by /Mike

Link fixed. Sorry about that

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 23:01:20 UTC | #857197

/Mike's Avatar Comment 7 by /Mike

Yes, the "create problem" is a bit odd. True that it's creating text to describe the problem but the button itself does come off as odd. I'll put it on the list of things to update. Thanks :-)

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 23:04:22 UTC | #857198

Chris Roberts's Avatar Comment 8 by Chris Roberts

I havn't read the book but that was a nice article.

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 23:28:25 UTC | #857208

helena!'s Avatar Comment 9 by helena!

Funny Catch-22 is next on my reading list - it's sitting on my bookshelf waiting patiently for me. Right now I'm reading Hitch-22 which is brilliantly written (no surprise there) and I would recommend to all.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 01:52:20 UTC | #857260

zengardener's Avatar Comment 10 by zengardener

Good book, and the movie isn't too bad either.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 02:37:10 UTC | #857274

Stevezar's Avatar Comment 11 by Stevezar

I read this book once, so I guess I need to read it again?

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 04:33:06 UTC | #857300

All About Meme's Avatar Comment 12 by All About Meme

My first exposure to Catch-22 was in my early teens, when a parody of the movie became the feature story in Mad Magazine. In between books by Edgar Rice Burroughs and Isaac Asimov, I had no idea I was being exposed to great contemporary literature.

If Joseph Heller was still around, I'm sure he'd be tickled pink by typing the word "catch" followed by a space into the Google search box, and then allowing it to auto-complete. His book is the very first entry.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 04:38:32 UTC | #857302

Functional Atheist's Avatar Comment 13 by Functional Atheist

What a terrific article--it truly makes me want to reread Catch-22. None of that abstruse jargon that spoils so much literary criticism--clear, cogent writing, building a case through evidence to a conclusion that seems brilliantly obvious, as well as absurdly funny, very much in keeping with the spirit of the novel (and very much one of those "why didn't I think of that?" moments).

This is one of those times when I particularly rue Douglas Adams' death, because I'd certainly like to hear his thoughts on Catch-22--I can't help but assume he was a fan, and I hope someone more knowledgeable than me can direct me to evidence of that...

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 06:21:34 UTC | #857324

JohnConstantineC's Avatar Comment 14 by JohnConstantineC

Comment 12 by All About Meme : If Joseph Heller was still around, I'm sure he'd be tickled pink by typing the word "catch" followed by a space into the Google search box, and then allowing it to auto-complete. His book is the very first entry.

True, but is there really any other catch than a catch - 22

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 07:19:02 UTC | #857335

All About Meme's Avatar Comment 15 by All About Meme

Comment 14 by JohnConstantineC

True, but is there really any other catch than a catch - 22

Well, there's always Catch 21!

;)

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 07:30:30 UTC | #857336

JohnConstantineC's Avatar Comment 16 by JohnConstantineC

Comment 15 by All About Meme :

...or I suppose catch of the day

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 07:34:26 UTC | #857337

Stafford Gordon's Avatar Comment 17 by Stafford Gordon

Two of the books I most admire, this one and William Shirer's "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich".

When I was in the army I pulled a fast one by putting a pebble in my boot so that I hobbled. I knew new recruits were watched closely for any negative signs, and sure enough I was summoned to the MO's office, where I took myself off to - de-pebbled of course - and was duly posted out of the infantry and given free driving lessons instead.

I also managed to appear to be in two places at once, but that's another story.

I don't think "Catch 22" is anti WW2, it's against war per se. And although Yossarion's anti god rant is fun, it's not as much to the point as the opening paragraph of chapter 2 of "TGD" by what's his name.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 07:56:03 UTC | #857343

Stafford Gordon's Avatar Comment 18 by Stafford Gordon

Correction to my last: I wasn't a recruit but a conscript.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 08:30:05 UTC | #857349

Didaktylos's Avatar Comment 19 by Didaktylos

@Stafford #17-8

Sounds like you're also familiar with the ways of The Good Soldier Szveyk (spelling?).

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 10:30:30 UTC | #857390

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 20 by Peter Grant

It's a tour de force of anti-Deism. People speak too narrowly when they talk of Catch-22 as a satire of humanity. It's that, yes, and there are few better. But it's really a vicious satiric attack on God, as much as his poorly made creatures. This denunciation of God comes from the heart—Yossarian's, anyway—and transcends any denunciation of the evil of war. It's about the evil of existence itself and the creator of that existence and that evil.

Yes, exactly! That was my favourite part as well :D

Will have to read it again now, or perhaps I'll watch the movie this time.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 11:06:24 UTC | #857401

Ignorant Amos's Avatar Comment 21 by Ignorant Amos

Comment 9 by helena!

Just got Hitch 22 but my partner has nipped in and started reading it first because I was slacking, now I will get half the book relayed to me across the room, raging!

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 11:38:14 UTC | #857411

Ignorant Amos's Avatar Comment 22 by Ignorant Amos

Comment 18 by Stafford Gordon

Correction to my last: I wasn't a recruit but a conscript.

Giving yer age away there fella.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 11:42:29 UTC | #857413

justinesaracen's Avatar Comment 23 by justinesaracen

Thanks to Rosenbaum for pointing out the atheistic passage in Catch 22, but he didn't need to take four long pages to do it. I got fed up on page two and just jumped to the end and saw what the hell he was driving at.

If I had been his composition teacher, I would have written in big letters "get there faster!"

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 11:45:16 UTC | #857414

Southpaw's Avatar Comment 24 by Southpaw

Managed to get Hitch-22 in hardback from the library soon after it was published. Marvellous stuff.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 11:51:49 UTC | #857415

keith's Avatar Comment 25 by keith

Managed to get Hitch-22 in hardback from the library soon after it was published. Marvellous stuff.

That's great, but this thread is about Catch-22, not Hitch-22. But hey, who cares. Which reminds me, I once ate duck in a Chinese restaurant.

I read (and enjoyed) Catch-22 twice when I was a teenager. Like Catcher in the Rye and On the Road and books by Hermann Hesse, it seems to appeal mainly to the young. Now that I'm older and I can see that actions have consequences and I am too old to be impressed by 'cool', I would tend to agree with Norman Podhoretz's view that the novel makes a non-absurd war seem absurd.

Yes, the passage is about theodicy, but that hardly means that the whole novel needs to be read in that light. Why does there have to be a key to the novel? Why can't it just be a novel that deals with several issues, one of them being theodicy? I thought the bit about tragedy/farce and the linking of seeing everything twice to some sort of critique of religion was far-fetched. Somehow it reads like an Eng. Lit. essay by a clever sophomore.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 14:23:05 UTC | #857467

helena!'s Avatar Comment 26 by helena!

Comment 25 by keith

That's great, but this thread is about Catch-22, not Hitch-22. But hey, who cares. Which reminds me, I once ate duck in a Chinese restaurant.

Hey snarky. This thread has nothing to do with what you ate or where.

If it weren't for Hitch-22 I would never have bothered to get Catch-22. That is the connection here. I got to give credit where it's due.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 14:56:02 UTC | #857473

irate_atheist's Avatar Comment 27 by irate_atheist

Gimme eat.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 15:45:44 UTC | #857484

Anonymous's Avatar Comment 28 by Anonymous

Comment Removed by Moderator

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 16:50:20 UTC | #857501

mr_rybread's Avatar Comment 29 by mr_rybread

This book was one of the few that survived what became the decimated corpses of literary classics that lay strewn about my feet after attempts were made to jam them down my throat.

I'll have to revisit most of those, with maturity.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 17:35:37 UTC | #857516

Pitchguest's Avatar Comment 30 by Pitchguest

Comment 20 by Peter Grant

It's a tour de force of anti-Deism. People speak too narrowly when they talk of Catch-22 as a satire of humanity. It's that, yes, and there are few better. But it's really a vicious satiric attack on God, as much as his poorly made creatures. This denunciation of God comes from the heart—Yossarian's, anyway—and transcends any denunciation of the evil of war. It's about the evil of existence itself and the creator of that existence and that evil.

Yes, exactly! That was my favourite part as well :D

Will have to read it again now, or perhaps I'll watch the movie this time.

In the comment section of the article piece:

If you believe man created God, instead of God creating man, a "satiric attack on God" is a "satire of humanity."

Makes sense.

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 18:33:07 UTC | #857539