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← Psychosis isn't always pathological

Psychosis isn't always pathological - Comments

SheilaC's Avatar Comment 1 by SheilaC

"It would seem that the more out-of-the-ordinary experiences are associated with clinical psychosis, the less chance people have of recognising their desirability, transiency, and psychological benefits, and the more chance they have of detrimental clinical consequences."

Desirability? Look, I'm quite prepared to believe that hearing voices doesn't necessarily mean that you're seriously ill. It might conceivably give you valuable insights into your feelings. But thinking that you're hearing god rather than your own subconscious could lead to making some truly dreadful choices.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 18:36:16 UTC | #878490

Marcus Small's Avatar Comment 2 by Marcus Small

Some of you may have come across the work the hearing voices network which was inspired by the work of Marius Romme.

I attended an interesting lecture on it all a couple months ago.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 19:05:23 UTC | #878503

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 3 by Peter Grant

Hearing voices isn't so bad, it's taking them seriously that causes problems.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 22:23:03 UTC | #878579

Michael Fisher's Avatar Comment 4 by Michael Fisher

Quoting Christian Jarrett for the BPS Research Digest:

Unusual, psychotic-like symptoms, such as hearing voices, are not as rare among the general population as you might think. For example, it's estimated that ten per cent of us hear voices that aren't there, with only a small minority of hearers likely to ever receive a clinical diagnosis.According to a new study**, this means that the factors that cause psychotic-like symptoms are likely different from those that lead to a diagnosis of pathological psychosis
This is blindingly obvious by definition. Just think of the range of "psychotic-like symptoms" & we all will have experienced some of them

** A study of 12 people. t w e l v e

Quoting the abstract "A qualitative comparison of psychotic-like phenomena in clinical and non-clinical populations"

Conclusions. It is not the OOE itself that determines the development of a clinical condition, but rather the wider personal and interpersonal contexts that influence how this experience is subsequently integrated. Theoretical implications for the refinement of psychosis models are outlined, and clinical implications for the validation and normalization of psychotic-like phenomena are proposed
Grade I Gobbledegook

It must be grant proposal time for these cowboys

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 02:44:50 UTC | #878652

irate_atheist's Avatar Comment 5 by irate_atheist

Comment 3 by Peter Grant -

Hearing voices isn't so bad, it's taking them seriously that causes problems.

I am married to someone who heard (still hears? I dare not know) the authentic voice of god talking to her in her head. She has one parent who also thinks she hears the voice in her head and another who's profession it was to convince people they should be hearing the voice in their head.

It has taken years of her being out of that malign environment for the symptoms to not really ever be present.

But that does not mean that one does not live every day with the knowledge of how serious her psychosis was and can be.

Comment 2 by Marcus Small

Some of you may have come across the work the hearing voices network which was inspired by the work of Marius Romme.

I attended an interesting lecture on it all a couple months ago.

Good man. I know we occasionally clash with our viewpoints, but if your congregation insist on being, well, a congregation, I am glad they have someone as enlightened as yourself trying to steer their ship. I have - horrifyingly - encountered vicars and worship leaders of various denominations who laud - to their face - individuals hearing voices in their heads and encourage them to do so. The experiences will never leave me although I wish they would.

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 08:54:52 UTC | #878684

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 6 by Peter Grant

Comment 5 by irate_atheist

I am married to someone who heard (still hears? I dare not know) the authentic voice of god talking to her in her head. She has one parent who also thinks she hears the voice in her head and another who's profession it was to convince people they should be hearing the voice in their head.

It has taken years of her being out of that malign environment for the symptoms to not really ever be present.

But that does not mean that one does not live every day with the knowledge of how serious her psychosis was and can be.

I also hear voices, which I used to attribute to all sorts of supernatural entities. Now that I'm an atheist I still hear them, but they are far less disconcerting, I even argue with them sometimes.

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 10:18:44 UTC | #878695

aquilacane's Avatar Comment 7 by aquilacane

Comment 6 by Peter Grant

I also hear voices, which I used to attribute to all sorts of supernatural entities. Now that I'm an atheist I still hear them, but they are far less disconcerting, I even argue with them sometimes.

I've always known the voices were mine and I would expect most people who hear voices know it's just them speaking to themselves. The problem is the person who doesn't realize the voices are theirs and, instead, holds a false idea of where those voices originate. "God is speaking to me" doesn't occur as a possibility to the person who doesn't have any concept of god.

In truth, I don't hear voices so much as use them. It's how I sort out ideas. I get consensus much faster than speaking with real people. I am not bombarded by strange voices all day; I know why each one is there and exactly what they are saying. Maybe it’s not the same thing.

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 13:30:25 UTC | #878730

SomersetJohn's Avatar Comment 8 by SomersetJohn

I hear voices in my head, and have done since fairly early childhood.

I have always known they were a product of my imagination. I used them to create stories, practice arguments and work through intellectual problems. I'm not so creative these days but those voices are still a useful tool for learning and clarifying thoughts. Not once have I ever thought the voices were external to me, or anything other than me talking to myself.

I can well believe hearing voices is a lot more common than some think, it's only when they are not recognised as internal that they can become dangerous.

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 14:35:56 UTC | #878745