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← Found: The Particular Brain Fold That Helps People Distinguish Between Imagination and Reality

Found: The Particular Brain Fold That Helps People Distinguish Between Imagination and Reality - Comments

aquilacane's Avatar Comment 1 by aquilacane

I don't have a problem remembering real from imaginary, just remembering is a big deal. I've actually worked with a lot of creative directors missing this fold. They are sure that my idea, picked by the client, actually belonged to them.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 18:44:19 UTC | #878493

Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 2 by Neodarwinian

" and it's size varies greatly in the general population " Be sure to read and understand that line you crypto-empiricists! ( you know who you are! )

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 19:29:18 UTC | #878514

Schrodinger's Cat's Avatar Comment 3 by Schrodinger's Cat

A fold in the front brain called the paracingulate sulcus

Something that distinguishes imagination and reality deserves a name that one could not say after a few pints.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 19:57:00 UTC | #878528

Atheist Mike's Avatar Comment 4 by Atheist Mike

And just in time for Dawkins' Magic of Reality! God is a comedian surely.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 20:09:38 UTC | #878534

strangebrew's Avatar Comment 5 by strangebrew

Comment 3 by Schrodinger's Cat

Something that distinguishes imagination and reality deserves a name that one could not say after a few pints.

Religios...regiigybums...religiowes dooby me ma flips..Religioes...oh screw it...'dumb fuckers'!

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 21:29:38 UTC | #878558

SheilaC's Avatar Comment 6 by SheilaC

It would be fascinating to see if there's a difference in the proportion of people with and without this fold in various religious and political groups.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 22:01:58 UTC | #878573

amd's Avatar Comment 7 by amd

Oh, if only it could be this easy.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 22:03:53 UTC | #878574

Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 8 by Peter Grant

I'm wondering if I have this brain fold or if I just imagine I do. Now I want a brain scan!

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 22:33:48 UTC | #878583

prettygoodformonkeys's Avatar Comment 9 by prettygoodformonkeys

Find 'em. Fold 'em.

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 23:09:15 UTC | #878592

QuestioningKat's Avatar Comment 10 by QuestioningKat

So how do you sign up to volunteer for experiments? Go to a large teaching/research hospital and see what's going on? I'd like to know if I had a fold and now it's smoothed out. I used to have a great memory; I could recall something verbatim. Now...

Comment 1 by aquilacane :

.... I've actually worked with a lot of creative directors missing this fold. They are sure that my idea, picked by the client, actually belonged to them.

Yes, it is a requirement for most creative directors. Since they are essentially frustrated artists/designers who are usually no longer doing the actual work. They think that their ten cents of advice allows them to claim ownership. I used to wonder why I would get stupid minor changes when designers of lesser skill received no feedback; my work after all was selected by clients more frequently. Then I realized that by micromanaging my designs, they felt a sense of accomplishment and ownership. If they did so to other designers, they'd be wasting their time. Unfortunately, I noticed that the more feedback and changes that was given to my work, the less likely the client would select my design. So I started creating my own extra side version, stick it in the package...they'd like it....

Thu, 06 Oct 2011 23:40:24 UTC | #878605

irate_atheist's Avatar Comment 11 by irate_atheist

Comment 3 by Schrodinger's Cat -

Much better if they'd called it Shatner's Bassoon.

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 08:35:24 UTC | #878682

Sample's Avatar Comment 12 by Sample

One study. Scans of individuals diagnosed with hyperthymesia (memory savants) would be my next step. All six of them. Then perhaps move on to interview world memory championship participants.

Mike

Fri, 07 Oct 2011 12:03:15 UTC | #878719

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 13 by DavidMcC

It isn't clear which kind of memeory is being tested, because it isn't stated either for how long the subject has to remember or how many items are on the list to remember. I suspect that people's scores (even relative scores) would depend quite a lot on these two factors.

Mon, 10 Oct 2011 14:12:22 UTC | #879391