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← Squid and octopus switch on camouflage

Squid and octopus switch on camouflage - Comments

Anvil's Avatar Comment 1 by Anvil

Fab! Nothing more maddening than trying to point out a camouflaged Octopus!

Anvil.

Thu, 10 Nov 2011 18:36:29 UTC | #889292

drumdaddy's Avatar Comment 2 by drumdaddy

These wonderful creatures are eons ahead of us in terms of blending into the environment.

Thu, 10 Nov 2011 18:54:28 UTC | #889297

Lapithes's Avatar Comment 3 by Lapithes

Imagine the LCDs you could make with that stuff

Thu, 10 Nov 2011 19:17:53 UTC | #889300

ridelo's Avatar Comment 4 by ridelo

The hours that I had to sit in the sun to get a negligible tan. It's not fair.

Thu, 10 Nov 2011 20:14:47 UTC | #889313

Andres Heredia's Avatar Comment 5 by Andres Heredia

Awesome!

Thu, 10 Nov 2011 20:42:12 UTC | #889318

Brennan's Avatar Comment 6 by Brennan

It's interesting how the deep-sea predators have developed the ability to 'shine their light' directly on them.

Comment 4 by ridelo :

The hours that I had to sit in the sun to get a negligible tan. It's not fair.

haha

Fri, 11 Nov 2011 04:50:00 UTC | #889360

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 7 by DavidMcC

Comment 3 by uuaschbaer :

Imagine the LCDs you could make with that stuff

Strictly speaking, uuaschbaer, they're more like electronic paper displays than LCDs:

Electrophoretic displays

Fri, 11 Nov 2011 09:23:57 UTC | #889390

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 8 by DavidMcC

The animals' skins contain light-sensitive cells called chromatophores, which contain pigments. When these cells detected the blue light of a bioluminescent predator, they immediately expanded, "dyeing" the animal a deep brown colour.

This can't be the whole story to explain their excellent colour matching to their background. Here's the rest of it:

Evidence for distributed light sensing in the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis

The skin opsins may provide an explanation for how cuttlefish can achieve their impressive camouflage and signalling body patterns in the absence of colour perception.

They go on to list a few possibilities, but here's the most credible one:

... (ii) Opsins may be closely associated with chromatophores that act as spectral tuning filters and convey wavelength information to the dermal opsins. Chromatophores expand and retract, and occur in different colour classes, and they could function much the same way as oil droplets function in colour vision of many animals such as turtles (Liebman & Granda 1975). In fact, the butterfly Heliconius erato has photoreceptors with one opsin pigment that provides colour discrimination using different perirhabdomal filter pigments (Zaccardi et al. 2006).

Fri, 11 Nov 2011 11:20:31 UTC | #889413

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 9 by DavidMcC

OK, the deep water species described in the OP don't have such a problem with colour matching to their background as shallow water species do. The light is mainly blue down there in any case, so brown-only camourflage should be sufficient down there. I was thinking of camourflage by shallow-water species (which have bigger problems blending in with their environment) in comment 8.

Fri, 11 Nov 2011 13:38:13 UTC | #889435

Virgin Mary's Avatar Comment 10 by Virgin Mary

I hope these little squiddies praised god for the gifts he has bestowed upon them!

Fri, 11 Nov 2011 20:55:03 UTC | #889522

Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 11 by Alan4discussion

Comment 10 by tmaxwell83 - I hope these little squiddies praised god for the gifts he has bestowed upon them!

They may have done so, but the other fishies could see right through them!

Fri, 11 Nov 2011 23:29:33 UTC | #889561

Virgin Mary's Avatar Comment 12 by Virgin Mary

HA!

Sat, 12 Nov 2011 10:36:44 UTC | #889626

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 13 by DavidMcC

Comment 11 by Alan4discussion They may have done so, but the other fishies could see right through them!

Except when they're in one of their dark moods.

Sat, 12 Nov 2011 11:55:22 UTC | #889633

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 14 by DavidMcC

... Or when they're just feeling browned off.

Sat, 12 Nov 2011 12:22:52 UTC | #889640

Virgin Mary's Avatar Comment 15 by Virgin Mary

Browned off? Is that even a thing?

Sat, 12 Nov 2011 12:36:57 UTC | #889645

Ignorant Amos's Avatar Comment 16 by Ignorant Amos

Comment 15 by tmaxwell83

Browned off? Is that even a thing?

Can I ask where you hail from? It's just that there is a quirkiness that I just can't place.

Adj. 1. browned off - greatly annoyed; out of patience; "had an exasperated look on his face"; "felt exasperated beyond endurance"

Sat, 12 Nov 2011 16:56:34 UTC | #889681

Virgin Mary's Avatar Comment 17 by Virgin Mary

Amazing, you learn something new every day!

Manchester.

Sat, 12 Nov 2011 19:29:45 UTC | #889706

DavidMcC's Avatar Comment 18 by DavidMcC

I should have realised that there would be a language problem sooner or later. After all, not only do we have people from all over the world on this site, we even have them from MANCHESTER! :)

Mon, 14 Nov 2011 11:23:51 UTC | #890014

Vicktor's Avatar Comment 19 by Vicktor

Comment 10 by tmaxwell83

I hope these little squiddies praised god for the gifts he has bestowed upon them!

Only stupid monkeys were made for that.

Tue, 15 Nov 2011 02:58:47 UTC | #890253