This site is not maintained. Click here for the new website of Richard Dawkins.

← Biology test omits creation theory, complains Kentucky educator

Biology test omits creation theory, complains Kentucky educator - Comments

gr8hands's Avatar Comment 1 by gr8hands

Superintendent Ricky should be fired for blatant ignorance. He is a danger to education.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 20:40:19 UTC | #898990

Quine's Avatar Comment 2 by Quine

What about the turtles? Why aren't they on the test? Everyone knows, it's turtles all the way down!

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 20:47:04 UTC | #898991

chawinwords's Avatar Comment 3 by chawinwords

In many states, as well as Kentucky, and, even some educated educators, prove that nuts grow on more than trees and bushes (no insult to the trees and bushes intended).

Consider the article's final sentence: The superintendent remained defiantly skeptical in the face of scientific consensus, noting that it was "interesting that the great majority of scientists felt Pluto was a planet until a short time ago, and now they have totally changed that."

What in the hell does that statement have to do within a rational discussion about the "Theory of Evolution" versus the cockamamie, crackpot theories of reality dreamed up by uneducated goat herders , having faith in talking snakes and donkeys and flying horses, etc. -- pure, childish, B.S. storytelling.

Wow, so science changed the description of what identifies a planet versus smaller cosmic bodies, but the reality of Pluto existing hasn't changed one whit. For example, there may be a time a-coming that I find a better descriptive term for crazy religious persons -- other than "Nuts!"

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 20:50:24 UTC | #898992

NewEnglandBob's Avatar Comment 4 by NewEnglandBob

The headline here has a serious error. It calls Superintendent Ricky D. Line an "educator". That is certainly not true and insulting to those who are.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:10:46 UTC | #899001

YouMan's Avatar Comment 5 by YouMan

I've met a man who tried to convince me that TV Sets are made by man! He told me, that man have developed techniques step by step over thousands of years until they came up with TV Sets! Very funny. Everybody knows that God gave us TV Sets. I mean, come on. When you've ever opened a broken TV Set you can see those tiny complex stuff inside! No moving pictures there! No little talking gnomes! Just stuff! Nobody can know how this all works! I don't know, You don't know! See? All to complicated for man! Pure Magic! So, if some teacher comes up with this Man-Made-TV-Sets-Theory again, and asks you how stuff works, just laugh about him, and tell him: Goddidit, ignorant fool!

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:13:18 UTC | #899002

Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 6 by Neodarwinian

Sigh!

Which " theory " of creation to teach? That is the burning question that ought to keep these nutters up at night.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:13:25 UTC | #899003

ShadowMind's Avatar Comment 7 by ShadowMind

This is a test, asking questions that require an answer that can be agreed upon by those marking the test.
Intelligent Design provides neither answers nor concensus, so it can't be included in the test!

The very concept of a god is irrelevant

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:20:38 UTC | #899005

holysmokes's Avatar Comment 8 by holysmokes

Perhaps we should explain directly to Mr. Line just what it takes to elevate a hypothesis to a theory. I went to the following website:

http://www.hart.k12.ky.us/content_page2.aspx?cid=176

and found his email address: ricky.line@hart.kyschools.us

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:27:18 UTC | #899010

Stafford Gordon's Avatar Comment 9 by Stafford Gordon

Acccording to Hitchens senior in 'Arguably', George Orwell said "It's almost impossible to be grown up and a Catholic" ; I would expand on that to say it's impossible to be religious and fully mature.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:31:03 UTC | #899011

potteryshard's Avatar Comment 10 by potteryshard

while totally omitting the creation story by a God who is bigger than all of us

Super Ricky may feel that God is bigger than he is; I find it humorous to attempt to associate a size with the non-existent.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:41:14 UTC | #899013

Valerie_'s Avatar Comment 11 by Valerie_

Comment 4 by NewEnglandBob :

The headline here has a serious error. It calls Superintendent Ricky D. Line an "educator". That is certainly not true and insulting to those who are.

I prefer the term "edumacator," as in, "I wents to college and gots an edumacation."

I'm sorry to say that we have a lot of edumacators in the US, and they're not all religious kooks.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 21:47:54 UTC | #899014

hemidemisemigod's Avatar Comment 12 by hemidemisemigod

I think each student should be given the right to chose how to complete this biology test. There should be two options. The first would be to answer the hows and whys of biology with scientific answers and the second option would be to use answers based on religious teachings such as "god did it" and "because he moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform".

The successful students would then receive either a Biology certificate or a Bible/Koran/Torah Study certificate.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 22:07:11 UTC | #899016

Wokkie's Avatar Comment 13 by Wokkie

one would find this teaching contradictory to the majority's belief systems

Indeed. Science is the only one that keeps wishthinking and superstition out of the process. It's the only method we know to honestly look at the universe. Religions are not valid ways to look at the world. Of course its contradictory. duh. QED

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 22:09:11 UTC | #899017

susanlatimer's Avatar Comment 14 by susanlatimer

Comment 6 by Neodarwinian

Sigh!

Which " theory " of creation to teach? That is the burning question that ought to keep these nutters up at night.

It doesn't keep them up at night, at all. The Christian theory of creation of course, because "America is a Christian nation".

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 22:12:24 UTC | #899018

AsylumWarden's Avatar Comment 15 by AsylumWarden

"My feeling is if the Commonwealth's site-based councils, school board members, superintendents and parents were questioned ... one would find this teaching contradictory to the majority's belief systems."

Sigh, but popular belief doesn't make it correct. Many years ago the majority's belief system held that the Earth was flat. A few years ago the majority appeared to believe the X-Factor was a credible show that helped unearth the best new musical talent.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 22:29:56 UTC | #899022

Marc Country's Avatar Comment 16 by Marc Country

That is an uneducated "educator".

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 22:32:33 UTC | #899023

Philoctetes                                        's Avatar Comment 17 by Philoctetes

Of all the things he could have attacked science on, his best argument is the classification of Pluto!!!!???

To be boringly pedantic, we have better instruments than we had in the '30's when Pluto was discovered, and these instruments have identified so many similar sized objects in the Kuiper Belt (in astronomical terms: next door to Pluto) that they had the choice of increasing the number of planets in our solar system to (say) approx. 666 or reducing it by 1. They chose the latter.

On the other hand you could say that the scientists are mistaken, as everyone knows that Pluto is Mickey Mouse's dog.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 22:53:37 UTC | #899027

glenister_m's Avatar Comment 18 by glenister_m

Much as I'd like to (I have a biology degree), I haven't been able to get a job teaching senior biology (including evolution) in high school in Canada, as those jobs only become available occasionally so there is a lot of competition from qualified applicants.

How I'd love to have the opportunity to teach it in the U.S., particularly down south, where I wouldn't bow to parental/community pressure on the evolution issue. Unfortunately it would mean living in the U.S. (and having to deal with guns, FOX news, lack of health care, Republicans, etc.), probably a salary cut, etc. Perhaps I could get a job touring schools, doing the evolution unit, and moving on to the next school/district/state?

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 23:17:08 UTC | #899031

Jumped Up Chimpanzee's Avatar Comment 19 by Jumped Up Chimpanzee

These sort of news articles are beginning to change my understanding of evolution, because I'm starting to believe that many Americans are turning into vegetables.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 23:25:58 UTC | #899037

Alex, adv. diab.'s Avatar Comment 20 by Alex, adv. diab.

Hyperintendent Line's argument is about at the intellectual level of "In Europe they have the metric system, and we don't. So them surveyors don't know what there talking about, and Kentucky is exactly the size of a football. And the earth is 6000 years old, too.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 23:44:46 UTC | #899040

JamesR's Avatar Comment 21 by JamesR

"God who is ;bigger than all of us."

Reminds me of that Python prayer that starts like this

Oh God. You are so big.

Wow though, those poor kids in Kentucky. How did this guy get his credentials?

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 23:59:33 UTC | #899048

I Deny's Avatar Comment 22 by I Deny

lol pluto

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 00:13:37 UTC | #899050

alf1200's Avatar Comment 23 by alf1200

Are you telling me snakes don't really talk? OHhhhhcrap! I gotta quit drinkin..........

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 00:53:14 UTC | #899063

mjwemdee's Avatar Comment 24 by mjwemdee

Oh the stupid... it hurts! it hurts!

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 01:10:07 UTC | #899067

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 25 by Border Collie

No one is stopping these idiots from having their little creationist tests in their Sunday schools. I mean, Biblical teachings take precedence over all, so why should such a little thorn in their sides worry them so? Make up your own little tests, give them in church and or Sunday school. Problem solved. Why worry about the small stuff?

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 01:54:31 UTC | #899070

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 26 by Border Collie

Kentucky Fried Cretin ...

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 02:00:44 UTC | #899071

Alan Canon's Avatar Comment 27 by Alan Canon

This makes me sad, for Hart County is one of my favorite spots in the world. It lies above one of the world's classic karst landscapes, the Dripping Springs Escarpment of the Pennyroyal Plateau, home to the world's longest cave system, which I'm proud to have discovered an entrance to.

Inside the Pennsylvanian / Mississippian limestone labyrinths of the Mammoth Cave system, and other caves of the region, I touch 300 million year old brachiopod and bryozoans fossils that "peer" at me from the walls, ceiling, and floors of the cave passages. The cave is much younger, of course, than the limestone fossil reef that it is made of, perhaps one or two million years old, and in measuring the shapes of the flow scallops on its surfaces combined with the cross section of its passages we can learn to estimate the average rainfall of the region over that entire period.

The life in the caves of Hart County is rich, and richly evolved within the cave environment, from extremophile bacteria to Hadonoecus cave crickets to snow white crayfish and blindfish, water clear round and flatworms which have adapted through evolution in only a few thousand centuries to this unique, lightless and temperature-stable environment.

Younger still are the artifacts and paleofecal specimens (dietary evidence) and even the bodies of Native American explorers who explored and exploited the cave centuries before the creationists say the world even existed.

I am a native Kentuckian. I love the natural world around me, from the beautiful city parks of my hometown out to the limits of the Universe and the living organisms studied by Edwin Hubble, Charles Darwin (and Kentucky's own father of the neo-Darwinian Synthesis, Thomas Hunt Morgan) and explained to me by the likes of Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Richard Dawkins, and thinkers like Sam Harris, Christopher Hitchens, and Dan Dennett.

I will always be a Kentuckian, wherever I go, be it to Mammoth Cave or the limestone hills of Devonshire which remind me so much of home. A proud Kentuckian. An evolved Kentuckian. Evolved and informed enough thanks to the likes of those who read and post here to know an ignorant retard when I see one.

Ramen, from Kentucky with love.

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 02:48:22 UTC | #899077

alf1200's Avatar Comment 28 by alf1200

Comment 12 by hemidemisemigod :

I think each student should be given the right to chose how to complete this biology test. There should be two options. The first would be to answer the hows and whys of biology with scientific answers and the second option would be to use answers based on religious teachings such as "god did it" and "because he moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform". The successful students would then receive either a Biology certificate or a Bible/Koran/Torah Study certificate.

I think every student should have the right to walk up to ricky d line and give him a quick slap across the face for wasting their education time with this nonsense. He should be removed from the Superintendent's position. NOW! His attempt to divert their education to religious mumbo-jumbo is a perversion of his position.

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 04:04:08 UTC | #899081

Save me jebuz!'s Avatar Comment 29 by Save me jebuz!

To Alan Canon,

Makes me sad too, think I've seen those caves on the tellybox. To think someone can experience such wonderful nature yet deny its time worn history and the many millennia of biological evolution of its blind inhabitants is truly a shame. Yet as far as Kentucky and its folk are concerned, at least we know there are some flowers amidst the shit-heap. Chin up.

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 04:04:33 UTC | #899082

JCarr's Avatar Comment 30 by JCarr

No one is telling creationists that they can't teach their 'beliefs' to their children, although many of us, myself included, find it disturbing. They can gather in their churches, if they wish, and convince themselves that their religious mythologies are true and factual, regardless of the complete lack of evidence. They have this freedom, and I think few of us on this website would argue that this freedom should be denied.

It is ironic to me, however, that although they have the freedom to practice their religion in any manner they see fit, they repeatedly infringe on the religious liberties of other Americans, especially when they insist that their religious views must be presented to all children, regardless of faith or non-faith, in a science classroom and passed off as a viable, legitimate scientific alternative. When rational and reasonable people point out that evolutionary biology is backed by a mountain of evidence and data, while their religious creation myth hasn't a shred of scientific evidence supporting it, they scream foul, arguing that their religion is being suppressed and children duped by a vast, worldwide conspiracy encouraging a false, satanic 'belief.' They just can't seem to understand that they themselves are the ones doing the pushing, not us, and not the scientific community.

It is unbelievably frustrating, isn't it? I had an angry Christian snarl at me once about my attempts to destroy religion. I told him I don't want to do away with religion at all, since it means so much to so many people, and I never want to tell people what to think or how to live. I just want religion to stay where it belongs: in people's homes, hearts, and churches. When it pushes outside of this comfort zone, like into our public school system, it inevitably causes problems.

It is a SCIENCE test, not a religious test. When discussing biology, it just isn't necessary to know the creation stories of various religions and mythologies from around the world, any more than it would be necessary to have knowledge of Zeus when examining supercells, lightning, or discussing meteorology.

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 04:06:07 UTC | #899084