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← Antimatter ‘measured’ for the first time, could reveal building blocks of the universe

Antimatter ‘measured’ for the first time, could reveal building blocks of the universe - Comments

ZenDruid's Avatar Comment 1 by ZenDruid

I say, that was an astoundingly well-written article. Kudos to Joseph Brean.

As the physicist Lawrence Krauss puts it in his new book, A Universe From Nothing, the strangeness of antimatter is like the strangeness of Belgians. “They are not really strange,” he writes. “It is just that one rarely meets them.”

My first actual 'lol' in recent memory....

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 07:27:16 UTC | #925294

susanlatimer's Avatar Comment 2 by susanlatimer

Comment 1 by ZenDruid

My first actual 'lol' in recent memory....

Mine was earlier.

Antimatter is just as it sounds, the opposite of stuff.

Sometimes, language almost does the trick.

And I agree. It was a well-written article. I think I understood it.

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 07:38:55 UTC | #925297

fuzzylogic's Avatar Comment 3 by fuzzylogic

Been a while since my country produced something I could be this proud of.

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 08:01:25 UTC | #925301

Mee Peestevone's Avatar Comment 4 by Mee Peestevone

The only thing I can remember is the Imax film format. The Avro Arrow, insulin, and pacemaker are before my time.

Comment 3 by fuzzylogic :

Been a while since my country produced something I could be this proud of.

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 08:42:57 UTC | #925308

ZenDruid's Avatar Comment 5 by ZenDruid

Go Canada, eh?

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 08:48:45 UTC | #925309

Lapithes's Avatar Comment 6 by Lapithes

Doing research by microwaving antimatter, that must be the youtube generation

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 08:50:40 UTC | #925310

Sample's Avatar Comment 7 by Sample

Good grief, that's one of the messiest labs I've ever seen. Good article though.

Mike

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 09:21:48 UTC | #925315

mr_DNA's Avatar Comment 8 by mr_DNA

This is very interesting to me because it lays ground for understanding many as yet understood features of the universe.

You must have heard theists often pose the question "do you believe the universe sprang out of nothing?" Whatever your answer they will respond that something can't come out of nothing from natural laws and the only possible explanation is that there has been a supernatural intervention to make the laws of physics come about ( or variations on this them depending on the articulacy of the speaker).

However energy does come out of apparent non existence all the time. So called 'virtual particles' wink in and out of existence throughout space time. What happens is that a particle and and an antimatter particle are created at the same time and after a tiny interval they collide and wipe each other out.

In certain circumstances ( such as Hawkins radiation from black holes ) this doesn't happen and the universe gains a small increase of energy. Anti matter is mysterious and any further discoveries can only further our understanding of how a universe comes out of nothing.

In any event virtual particles clearly happen because of natural laws not as a result of a magical suspension of natural laws.

I find this useful when confronting the old chestnut of how do you get something out of nothing ( its tortoises all the way down )

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 10:05:00 UTC | #925323

JeffVader67's Avatar Comment 9 by JeffVader67

Impressive work, but I'm afraid particle physics make my head spin! I wish I could understand it. Staying on the German / Swiss border later in the year. Has anyone been to the CERN visitors exhibition and is it suitable for a curious 8 year old?

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 10:09:51 UTC | #925325

aroundtown's Avatar Comment 10 by aroundtown

Very exciting stuff. This is a period of time in which we might actually disprove the fictional fairy tale that has haunted us for far too long. From my perspective it seems as though the matter would have been far easier to examine in the early stages some 14 billion years ago when the matter was more equally distributed and now we are struggling to measure a far diminished out of balance matter percentage. This work in concert with the Higgs work will be exciting to consider when the picture becomes more focused.

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 12:44:16 UTC | #925363

AlcubierreDrive's Avatar Comment 11 by AlcubierreDrive

This is fascinating work that holds deep implications for our understanding of the universe. The best part about physics is that the more we know, the more we realize we still have to learn. Can't wait to see what the upcoming years of discoveries will reveal.

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 13:52:01 UTC | #925375

btheist's Avatar Comment 12 by btheist

Exciting stuff, or is that exciting opposite of stuff! Makes me proud to be Canadian, it almost makes up for us foisting Alan Thick on the world... well almost!

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 17:02:01 UTC | #925413

Gnu Atheist's Avatar Comment 13 by Gnu Atheist

What I don't get is how we can ever hope to control antimatter without dilithium crystals.

"I cannah change the laws of physics!" - Scotty

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 17:26:57 UTC | #925421

prettygoodformonkeys's Avatar Comment 14 by prettygoodformonkeys

Also proud of this Canadian contribution and my native BC as well, but I remind myself this is a human accomplishment once again, not a partisan one.

Otherwise I would feel I have to apologise for Bryan Adams. It wasn't my fault.

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 19:09:47 UTC | #925443

Billions and Billions's Avatar Comment 15 by Billions and Billions

“We’re here because matter won out,” said Prof Hayden.

If the properties of anti-matter are found to be similar to matter -- just opposite -- then Hayen's statement is incorrect. Life could still have arisen -- we would just be composed of anti-matter.

Exciting research!

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 19:34:30 UTC | #925448

mmurray's Avatar Comment 16 by mmurray

Comment 14 by prettygoodformonkeys :

Also proud of this Canadian contribution and my native BC as well, but I remind myself this is a human accomplishment once again, not a partisan one.

Otherwise I would feel I have to apologise for Bryan Adams. It wasn't my fault.

It's OK he's cancelled out by Neil Young and William Gibson. You should take some credit for the science as it's your taxes paying.

Michael

Thu, 08 Mar 2012 21:23:50 UTC | #925466

zengardener's Avatar Comment 17 by zengardener

@ JeffVader67

Has anyone been to the CERN visitors exhibition and is it suitable for a curious 8 year old?

Even if your child doesn't understand particle physics, they are sure to be impressed with the architecture and devices. Just show your child the picture in the article and ask what it might be for.

Fri, 09 Mar 2012 00:34:29 UTC | #925500

DLJ's Avatar Comment 18 by DLJ

I don't understand the picture caption.

What have they got against mothers?

Sat, 10 Mar 2012 03:28:27 UTC | #925779

AULhall's Avatar Comment 19 by AULhall

I, too, enjoyed this article. The explanatory video linked along with the article was also excellent.

Sat, 10 Mar 2012 16:23:31 UTC | #925892