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← Tennessee Passes ‘Monkey Bill’ To Teach The ‘Controversy’ On Evolution And Climate Science

Tennessee Passes ‘Monkey Bill’ To Teach The ‘Controversy’ On Evolution And Climate Science - Comments

JHJEFFERY's Avatar Comment 1 by JHJEFFERY

Here we go again.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 17:50:54 UTC | #929651

mitch486's Avatar Comment 2 by mitch486

I have several questions to ask, as I'm sure many of you do as well. Below are the email addresses of the two crackpots responsible for this Bill. Let's get to it.

Bill Dunn: rep.bill.dunn@capitol.tn.gov

Bo Watson: sen.bo.watson@capitol.tn.gov

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 17:50:56 UTC | #929652

Magorian's Avatar Comment 3 by Magorian

Oh come on. This is ridiculous. Thank you, mitch486, for providing those email addresses.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 17:57:13 UTC | #929654

Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 4 by Alan4discussion

Democracy - Elect monkeys - live in the jungle!! (Apologies to monkeys once again!)

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:01:58 UTC | #929655

Mr. Stick's Avatar Comment 5 by Mr. Stick

The teaching of some scientific subjects, including, but not limited to, biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, global warming, and human cloning, can cause controversy . . . The state board of education, public elementary and secondary school governing authorities, directors of schools, school system administrators, and public elementary and secondary school principals and administrators shall endeavor to assist teachers to find effective ways to present the science curriculum as it addresses scientific controversies.

Technically there's nothing wrong here. These subjects can cause controversy, on the other hand there is no scientific controversy to address!

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:06:08 UTC | #929656

isisdron's Avatar Comment 6 by isisdron

one step forward, two steps back. Who will help the US of A? it is being overrun with hicks and crazies.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:15:10 UTC | #929660

aroundtown's Avatar Comment 7 by aroundtown

That particular stench of the new wind that is blowing across America. I am amazed that people do not understand that these religious nuts will stop at nothing to spread the delusion. If the uninvolved and aloof think it will just slink back into the woodwork they had better think again. The High Tide of Religious filth is upon us.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:15:23 UTC | #929661

RW Millam's Avatar Comment 8 by RW Millam

If they can teach lies in our science classes, can we teach truth in their Sunday school classes?

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:18:08 UTC | #929663

ColdThinker's Avatar Comment 9 by ColdThinker

Sad, baffling and darkly amusing at the same time. This from a nation of the best universities and most Nobel laureates, a nation with the intellectual capability of sending rovers to Mars.

The breadth of the spectrum of American scientific understanding never ceases to amaze an innocent European outsider.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:18:09 UTC | #929664

drumdaddy's Avatar Comment 10 by drumdaddy

Whoever said ignorance is bliss was not thinking clearly.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:21:49 UTC | #929665

rrh1306's Avatar Comment 11 by rrh1306

I doubt most teachers in Tennessee are teaching Evolution in the first place. I guess that's not enough though. I suppose they feel the need to actively try to convince students that Evolution is not a viable science.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:24:08 UTC | #929667

MilitantNonStampCollector's Avatar Comment 12 by MilitantNonStampCollector

How about the "controversies" of germ theory, heliocentric theory and gravitational theory? Would Bo Watson and Bill Dunn find it controversial to jump off a high cliff? There has to be consistency here, you can't have it both ways. Either apply it to all scientific theories or throw the stupid controversy label out altogether.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:28:30 UTC | #929670

drumdaddy's Avatar Comment 13 by drumdaddy

Republicans are ramming this garbage into science classes while totally ignoring fervent objections from the following groups:

The National Association of Biology Teachers, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee, the American Institute for Biological Sciences, the Knoxville News Sentinel, the Nashville Tennessean, the National Association of Geoscience Teachers, the National Earth Science Teachers Association, the Tennessee Science Teachers Association, and all eight Tennessee members of the National Academy of Sciences (including Stanley Cohen, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1986) in opposing the bills.

The evangelical agenda has no time to listen to any experts in any fields but their own.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:30:01 UTC | #929672

MAJORPAIN's Avatar Comment 14 by MAJORPAIN

I would hope "the controversy" would enlighten some children, but unfortunately, if they go home to redneck parents, the crap part of what they're learning at school will be reinforced. Pity.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:32:16 UTC | #929674

drumdaddy's Avatar Comment 15 by drumdaddy

By the way, this should open a door to "teach the controversy" about religions in all schools.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:32:32 UTC | #929675

dregstudios's Avatar Comment 16 by dregstudios

Tennessee is dead-set on herding its citizens back to the dark ages. In the past two years, the Governor and Republican Party have squashed Gay Rights statutes in the city of Nashville, developed laws targeting peaceful protesters and made it illegal to post “potentially offensive images” to the internet. The “Monkey Law” now brings religion back into the classroom by opening debate for creationism. In addition, a new law puts the Ten Commandments back in public buildings around the state. There is a clear cut suppression of progressive thinking by the Republican Party and I addressed these issues “illegally” on my artist’s blog at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2011/07/potentially-offensive-portrait-governor.html with a portrait of the Governor to address his party’s absurd agendas.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:33:58 UTC | #929676

aroundtown's Avatar Comment 17 by aroundtown

Comment 9 by ColdThinker - Sad, baffling and darkly amusing at the same time. This from a nation of the best universities and most Nobel laureates, a nation with the intellectual capability of sending rovers to Mars.

The breadth of the spectrum of American scientific understanding never ceases to amaze an innocent European outsider.

The lofty heights we had obtained is quickly becoming a "once upon a time" story I'm afraid. Might I suggest the advances such as Cern that have shown the Europeans passing us. To use an analogy it's as though we've settled on a moped and you've acquired a Ferrari. The commitment to advancing thought unhinged from the invisible monkey in the sky is largely responsible for the shift. I wish we were actually brothers in arms advancing on subjects that would truly and honestly illuminate man but that has become a failed hope for the immediate future I'm afraid. Some might say we are involved with Cern and are still dedicated to scientific advancement but the resistance to utilize the knowledge is firmly in place here. It's like were staring at a gallon of water right in front of our face yet we are dying of thirst.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:34:52 UTC | #929677

paulmcuk's Avatar Comment 18 by paulmcuk

In instances like this, would students/parents not have a case to sue the State for denying them a proper education?

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 18:42:00 UTC | #929682

louis14's Avatar Comment 19 by louis14

In the Dover PA vs Kitzmiller trial a few years back, the teachers made the first stand, by citing a provision of the Pennsylvania teacher code of ethics that they would never knowingly present false information to a student.

Is there not something like this in Tennessee?

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 19:04:54 UTC | #929687

Wake_Up's Avatar Comment 20 by Wake_Up

Just remember, if it doesn't agree with a 3,000 year old book, it must be questioned, and taught as controversy....It was the ancient people back then that had all the answers we need today...write that down.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 19:06:12 UTC | #929688

ColdThinker's Avatar Comment 21 by ColdThinker

Comment 17 by aroundtown :

I wish we were actually brothers in arms advancing on subjects that would truly and honestly illuminate man but that has become a failed hope for the immediate future I'm afraid. Some might say we are involved with Cern and are still dedicated to scientific advancement but the resistance to utilize the knowledge is firmly in place here. It's like were staring at a gallon of water right in front of our face yet we are dying of thirst.

Putting my wishful thinking cap on, there might be a positive side to this in the long run. Perhaps the ridiculous social pressure science has to cope with in the US might force a lot of American scientists turn their eyes to Europe or Asia, which may open up new channels and benefit everybody eventually. Science is a universal endeavour and it will prevail even if one major society suffers from temporary political setbacks.

The denial of global warming is more dangerous, though, since our time is running out. Without the political will in the US to do something about it, there is little hope for the planet. Sadly even Europe has to deal with countries like coal dependent Poland fighting European climate agreements. (Apologies to our Polish friends, but is it just coincidental that Poland is also arguably the most religious of the European countries?)

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 19:39:51 UTC | #929695

aquilacane's Avatar Comment 22 by aquilacane

Wow, stupid. So I guess folks from Tennessee can kiss a decent wage goodbye.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 19:42:25 UTC | #929696

SheerReason's Avatar Comment 23 by SheerReason

It's no wonder the U.S. is slipping in its role as an economic superpower with priorities like "Intelligent Design" and "Teach the Controversy". Someone just nuke us now before we really embarrass ourselves...

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 19:48:00 UTC | #929700

Daryl 's Avatar Comment 24 by Daryl

It really shows that the third great scheme of creation, the Flying Spaghetti Monster, is correct. Because:

  1. Tennessee hasn't evolved since Scopes, and
  2. The bipeds walking around there are not designed intelligently.

That leaves the FSM, and clearly, he hasn't bothered touching anyone there with His Noodly Tendrils.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 19:49:56 UTC | #929702

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 25 by Border Collie

Another step toward becoming a third world country ... Tennessee already is ... forty nine to go. Thanks, Republican cretins, for laying another brick on the wall of abject ignorance.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 20:09:29 UTC | #929707

Metamag's Avatar Comment 26 by Metamag

Comment 11 by rrh1306 :

I doubt most teachers in Tennessee are teaching Evolution in the first place.

Yep, teachers are pretty much intimidated from even mentioning the word "evolution" in the red states, also there is a shocking number of teachers who are creationists themselves.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 20:25:15 UTC | #929710

tembuki's Avatar Comment 27 by tembuki

Comment 26 by Metamag :

Yep, teachers are pretty much intimidated from even mentioning the word "evolution" in the red states, also there is a shocking number of teachers who are creationists themselves.

...as was sadly evident from some of the comments past the link.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 20:38:53 UTC | #929712

JohnNorris's Avatar Comment 28 by JohnNorris

The people at the state school board or dept of education responsible for developing the science curriculum should insist the legislature specifically list the controversies and resources for teaching them. The legislature will never do it so the law is just re-election grandstanding.

Now if Tennessee does pull it off, I hope this opens the door to teaching the controversies about abstinence only sex education.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 20:41:57 UTC | #929714

Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 29 by Neodarwinian

A veto is the only rational response here Governor.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 21:23:56 UTC | #929724

Stafford Gordon's Avatar Comment 30 by Stafford Gordon

What is it the religionists don't get? Almost everything it would seem. 1925 to 2012, and still no change; nothing learnt. That's got to be some kind of record surely.

Perhaps the Cantonese dialect word "dim sum" could be applied; dimwits, certainly could. Yes, The Dimwits Award, that would do very nicely.

Thu, 22 Mar 2012 21:33:49 UTC | #929727