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← How Texas Inflicts Bad Textbooks on Us

How Texas Inflicts Bad Textbooks on Us - Comments

Alternative Carpark's Avatar Comment 1 by Alternative Carpark

I've said it before, and I'll say it again.

Secession: you know it makes sense.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 00:31:24 UTC | #944877

Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 2 by Neodarwinian

I have yet to see a map of the Texas text book influence on the states of the US. Or would I recoil in horror if I saw such a map? Where does Texas think it is headed with this nonsense? The 13th century?

" crunchy granola worldview. "

California's world view is not really limited to grade school work. Secular creationism rears it's ugly head in California at the college level. I once had to take a required course called Men's Health 27 that was so disconnected from reality that I skipped the second half of class religiously.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 01:07:52 UTC | #944880

Gglgrl's Avatar Comment 3 by Gglgrl

Common core education standards in English, math, science and social studies (which Texas and 2 other smallish states have not adopted), combined with the eventual replacement of the textbook medium by digital, content-rich media, will render Texas's textbook content-skewing tactics obsolete and irrelevant in the next 5-10 years

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 03:30:16 UTC | #944892

S. Gudmundsson's Avatar Comment 4 by S. Gudmundsson

Colbert's Maxim applies so very well to this situation.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 06:24:42 UTC | #944905

Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 5 by Alan4discussion

Tex-ass

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 08:04:14 UTC | #944917

rod-the-farmer's Avatar Comment 6 by rod-the-farmer

I have said this before....

I think a partial cure to this is to have universities list a very public requirement regarding students from Texas (or other states who use Texas science books). If they apply for admission to first year courses involving science, they must take and pass a remedial science course lasting one semester or more, to be accepted. And this would be at their own expense. All the goofy stuff will be straightened out. But maybe it will take more than one semester to do that. And maybe there are first year courses that have no science components. Then the opportunity is gone, and we have a generation of students who can't think rationally.

If I were a Texas student or parent of one, and I found out there was an additional cost in money and time to get into first year university just because I am from Texas, I might pay more attention to the agendas of school board trustees, and the content of science and social studies textbooks.

A side question......does the SAT not point out problems in these areas ? Do Texas students do more poorly than those from New York, for example ?

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 10:12:31 UTC | #944932

Tridhos's Avatar Comment 7 by Tridhos

At this rate it will not be Captain Kirk in charge of the Enterprise when it comes along but Captain Cheng.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 11:18:15 UTC | #944944

Roedy's Avatar Comment 8 by Roedy

Right now it costs too much to produce multiple textbooks. If textbooks were distributed electronically as e-books, or on the web, they would be a lot cheaper. There would be no wear and tear. They could not get lost or eaten by puppies. They could be updated each year, and Texans could lie to their kids, but others would not have to.

As I side effect, for no additional cost, the USA could donate a complete textbooks to every child on the planet, and university student! The problem then is providing the kids with electronic access, but at least the content is there waiting -- at least in libraries.

You might ask if Texans wants to commit economic suicide, should we not let them? Why protect religious fruitcakes from the consequences of their beliefs? The reason is the kids are the victims of the adult folly.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 12:43:29 UTC | #944953

Red Dog's Avatar Comment 9 by Red Dog

Comment 3 by Gglgrl :

Common core education standards in English, math, science and social studies (which Texas and 2 other smallish states have not adopted), combined with the eventual replacement of the textbook medium by digital, content-rich media, will render Texas's textbook content-skewing tactics obsolete and irrelevant in the next 5-10 years

That is the easiest and most common sense solution to this problem. The way education standards are defined in the US is archaic. Each state defines their own unique standards. What we should have is one common set of standards for the whole US. Unfortunately, as with so many issues, the common sense solution has little chance to pass due to politics and greed.

The companies that market the text books and tests (more or less the same companies) love the current system since they get to charge each state for their own standards as if they were constructed from scratch when in reality they re-use a lot of core course and test content. And the states also like the current system. It empowers a redundant bureacracy in each state that is responsible for defining that state's standards. Doing it logically (one standard for the whole country) would put a lot of people out of work.

Also, there is the insanity of state pride. I experienced this first hand when I consulted for one of the state boards. When people first started saying things like "Ohio is totally unique" I thought they were kidding. Luckily I soon realized they were serious.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 14:34:09 UTC | #944982

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 10 by Border Collie

www.tfn.org

Says it all, every day.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 19:31:25 UTC | #945058

Border Collie's Avatar Comment 11 by Border Collie

www.tfn.org

Says it all, every day.

Actually, I'm not sure it makes any difference. I think I've seen my girlfriend's two teenagers crack a textbook maybe half a dozen times in their entire combined 8 high school years. They typically throw them in the floor at the first of the school year, then pick them up from the floor at the end of the school year when they have to turn them in.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 20:46:08 UTC | #945072

Red Dog's Avatar Comment 12 by Red Dog

Comment 11 by Border Collie :

www.tfn.org

Says it all, every day.

Actually, I'm not sure it makes any difference. I think I've seen my girlfriend's two teenagers crack a textbook maybe half a dozen times in their entire combined 8 high school years. They typically throw them in the floor at the first of the school year, then pick them up from the floor at the end of the school year when they have to turn them in.

Ah yes, these kids these days, when I was a boy we had to walk to school for 2 hours in the snow in our bare feet after working the night shift at the factory... and we liked it!

Dropping out of geezer mode, I'm glad to say that in my experience not all young people are like your girlfriends teens. My daughter for example cracks the books just about every night. And she likes it, at least for most classes.

Fri, 01 Jun 2012 23:18:16 UTC | #945098

Quine's Avatar Comment 13 by Quine

Here is a tiny bit of good election news from Texas, in terms of getting some diversity into the Legislature.

http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_20775228/new-face-politics-district-75-representative-elect-mary

That's right, Latina lesbian elected in El Paso. I did not expect that, any time soon. I don't know her position on Evolution in textbooks, but she does come from an education background.

Wed, 06 Jun 2012 16:20:05 UTC | #945901