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← In U.S., 46% Hold Creationist View of Human Origins

In U.S., 46% Hold Creationist View of Human Origins - Comments

Metamag's Avatar Comment 1 by Metamag

In U.S., 46% Hold Creationist View of Human Origins

This is simply not true.

It is 78%.

Theistic evolution doesn't have anything to do with evolution, it's an oxymoronic notion.

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 19:06:51 UTC | #945323

Ornicar's Avatar Comment 2 by Ornicar

This study should also check how much money do those people earn per day.

Worldwide, the poorest countries are also the most religious. The US seem to be the exception, but if you take the 10 richest percents out, you get a GNP/habitant close to third world figures. And the most religious states of the US are also the poorest.

On the other hand, the most secular countries in the world are those with best organised national solidarity (welfare, health insurance, good public schools, etc.).

I can't remember who said something like:"If you think education is expensive, try the cost of ignorance."

American secularists are paying the cost of ignorance.

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 19:27:31 UTC | #945327

Cook@Tahiti's Avatar Comment 3 by Cook@Tahiti

That's a lot of nutjobs. Is any of RDF's et al work over the years making any impact? Is the nutjob line trending down at all?

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 19:30:55 UTC | #945329

Sample's Avatar Comment 4 by Sample

Ridicule is seen by these YECs as a mere fulfillment of prophesy. A brilliant meme.

Mike

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 19:48:18 UTC | #945332

rrh1306's Avatar Comment 5 by rrh1306

41 percent of democrats polled think that the planet is 10,000 years old. That's real encouraging.

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 19:51:26 UTC | #945333

rrh1306's Avatar Comment 6 by rrh1306

Comment Removed by Author

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 19:52:08 UTC | #945334

All About Meme's Avatar Comment 7 by All About Meme

Comment 4 by Sample

Ridicule is seen by these YECs as a mere fulfillment of prophesy.

Can you quote your source? There was no mention of "ridicule" in this article.

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:12:09 UTC | #945338

Deako's Avatar Comment 8 by Deako

There does at least seem to be a trend to a scientific view of human origins. It looks like in only a few hundred years there may even be more who understand this view than that humans were created in the last 11000 years.

Greg

Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:29:56 UTC | #945342

The Truth, the light's Avatar Comment 9 by The Truth, the light

While the overall trends of the poll are interesting/discouraging, it poll really is confirming the obvious, ie:

  • The Most Religious Americans Are Most Likely to Be Creationists

  • Those With Postgraduate Education Least Likely to Believe in Creationist Explanation

  • Highly religious Americans are more likely to be Republican than those who are less religious

  • Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:39:46 UTC | #945345

    Jumped Up Chimpanzee's Avatar Comment 10 by Jumped Up Chimpanzee

    It continues to annoy me enormously that people discuss "God" in this sort of context without ever asking anyone to explain what it is and how it operates. Why is there always this unspoken assumption that everyone knows what they are talking about?

    I wish that after they asked the initial question, they then asked those who answered that God had created humans to explain exactly how God did this. I'm pretty sure that in every case there would have been a long silence followed by a few "ums" and "ers". What else could anyone say? It might make a few of them reflect on the fact that they are making assertions about absolutely nothing at all.

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:43:21 UTC | #945346

    The Truth, the light's Avatar Comment 11 by The Truth, the light

    I'd also say that the second option could be better worded.

    Instead of:

    "Human beings have developed over millions of years from much less advanced forms of life, but God had no part in this process"

    better to have something like

    "Human beings have developed over millions of years as is plainly obvious by the overwhelming amount of evidence and without the intellectual crippling need to invoke an imaginary creator".

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:44:41 UTC | #945347

    Misfire's Avatar Comment 12 by Misfire

    I agree with Metamag, comment 1. If you think evolution was guided by a god, there's nothing interesting about it in the least. It's like saying that when you flip a light switch, Jehovah notices and turns on the lights for you.

    I'm going to go ahead and lower the number to around 58% though, as 20% of Americans always agree with every statement you can think up, and aren't worth considering.

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 21:22:53 UTC | #945353

    Sample's Avatar Comment 13 by Sample

    Comment 7 by All About Meme

    Comment 4 by Sample

    Ridicule is seen by these YECs as a mere fulfillment of prophesy.

    Can you quote your source? There was no mention of "ridicule" in this article.

    Rhetorical speech on my part All About Meme regarding the ramifications of YEC beliefs and how they are ridiculed (by me for one), and that this verse: Luke 21:17 (All men will hate you because of me), has been used as proof by Christians when called out on ridicule-worthy faith-positions.

    I didn't think my comment was controversial on this site, is there something you'd like to ferret out that I'm missing?

    Mike

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 21:22:55 UTC | #945354

    Neodarwinian's Avatar Comment 14 by Neodarwinian

    I wonder if Richard Leakey read this? If he had he would not have been so quick to say that this sort of nonsense will be over in a matter of years. It is a matter of years, but I think years uncounted before we are rid of these people and their craziness.

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 21:27:54 UTC | #945356

    All About Meme's Avatar Comment 15 by All About Meme

    Comment 13 by Sample

    Thanks for the clarification!

    P.S. I'm watching Jerry DeWitt on The Atheist Experience of Austin right now!

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 21:34:55 UTC | #945358

    Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 16 by Alan4discussion

    Religious faith rots the brain, as does repeated assertion of it! The dumb and stupid can take pride in their dumb stupidity, once they are too ignorant to notice it, and have equally ignorant support for mutual congratulation.

    9% to 15% is an improvement in the recognition of scientific reality over 30 years, - but not much of one in global terms.

    Sun, 03 Jun 2012 21:50:07 UTC | #945360

    Rawhard Dickins's Avatar Comment 17 by Rawhard Dickins

    .. and god made himself .. . right!

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 00:12:55 UTC | #945374

    TerryStokeB's Avatar Comment 18 by TerryStokeB

    America does not have a monopoly on this theistic stupidity. The minds of countless millions across the globe are infected with these pernicious dangerous beliefs.

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 04:13:15 UTC | #945395

    AForceOne's Avatar Comment 19 by AForceOne

    Is it any surprise that so many believe in creationist clap trap if it is allowed to be taught in schools and colleges thereby giving it credence?

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 05:36:24 UTC | #945404

    Roedy's Avatar Comment 20 by Roedy

    Keep in mind there is a distinction between what you believe and what you think is socially acceptable to believe and what you say you believe when polled by strangers.

    This a bit like American soldiers taking polls in Afghanistan. You can be pretty sure most people will say what they think the soldier wants them to say.

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 06:41:43 UTC | #945410

    scottishgeologist's Avatar Comment 21 by scottishgeologist

    There is an intersting small but sharp divergence at the RHS of that chart. Creationism gaining at the expense of theistic evolution.

    This is exactly what is happening regarding liberal/ traditional and evangelical churches. The tradtional ones, who are most likelty to support theistic evolution are shrinking. The evangies are coallescing round a hard core, which is more likely to be YEC. (and also homophoubic and mysoginist)

    The same thing is happening here in the UK

    A situation will eventually develop where the only Christian churches will be charismatic, evangelical lunatic asylums with a cross on the roof.

    :-) SG

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 07:59:39 UTC | #945418

    78rpm's Avatar Comment 22 by 78rpm

    It would be nice to know what percent of the total people called didn't want to take part in the poll in the first place, and said in effect, "Go away, I don't want to play your games!" I wonder if creation believers are more likely to want to talk about religion than non-believers. This could well make it appear that the proportion of believers is higher than it really is. I don't know---just asking.

    Yes, I know that there is a thick Bible Belt in the south of the U.S. (and in Rhode Island, so I've recently seen), but still, creationism is a geographic phenomenon here. The north, especially in the cities, is like another country in that respect. I would like to see them acknowledge this.

    And two questions that should be asked anyway when evaluating poll results are

    1.  Who paid for this poll to be made?
    2.  Why was it made?
    

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 11:46:41 UTC | #945455

    FastBill's Avatar Comment 23 by FastBill

    I find the trend frightening that 46% of Americans believe in Creationism and don't believe that mankind evolved. Don't they realize that there have been hundreds of god and goddesses over the last 6,000 years? There have even been feather gods.

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 12:52:29 UTC | #945459

    FastBill's Avatar Comment 24 by FastBill

    strong textThere appears to be a direct correlation between a belief in a god and a lack of formal education. However, there are many educated individuals who are religious but participate in religion solely for the social interaction and not because they believe in a god.

    It is difficult to believe that so many have been "hoodwinked" by religious organizations. Religion is one of the greatest con games in existance. There is not one shread of evidence to support the existance of a god. If anyone has any evidence I would be receptive to reconsidering my position.

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 13:03:04 UTC | #945460

    Peter Grant's Avatar Comment 25 by Peter Grant

    In U.S., 85% are still idiots

    http://www.gallup.com/poll/155003/Hold-Creationist-View-Human-Origins.aspx

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 13:50:02 UTC | #945463

    Stevezar's Avatar Comment 26 by Stevezar

    Comment 12 by Misfire :

    I agree with Metamag, comment 1. If you think evolution was guided by a god, there's nothing interesting about it in the least. It's like saying that when you flip a light switch, Jehovah notices and turns on the lights for you.

    I'm going to go ahead and lower the number to around 58% though, as 20% of Americans always agree with every statement you can think up, and aren't worth considering.

    I am not one of the 20% that is going to agree with this statistic without seeing the evidence to back it up!

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 14:22:53 UTC | #945471

    BeforeIForget92's Avatar Comment 27 by BeforeIForget92

    This statistic is both depressing and baffling at the same time. You have to deny belief in so many areas in order to maintain a YEC point of view; theistic evolution requires a seriously flawed train of thought as well. Oh well, people seem to feel that if they believe in something with enough passion that it somehow makes it true.

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 15:41:21 UTC | #945491

    Jumped Up Chimpanzee's Avatar Comment 28 by Jumped Up Chimpanzee

    Comment 23 by FastBill

    I find the trend frightening that 46% of Americans believe in Creationism and don't believe that mankind evolved. Don't they realize that there have been hundreds of god and goddesses over the last 6,000 years? There have even been feather gods.

    Well, feathers is a start. What's the Christian god made of?

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 16:19:33 UTC | #945498

    Brandon Lee Brewer's Avatar Comment 29 by Brandon Lee Brewer

    Comment 23 by FastBill :

    I find the trend frightening that 46% of Americans believe in Creationism and don't believe that mankind evolved. Don't they realize that there have been hundreds of god and goddesses over the last 6,000 years? There have even been feather gods.

    I think I must have angered the feather gods, because I could not find a cool spot on my down pillow last night. Or maybe I just had a lot on my mind. Either way I think I'll sacrifice some chickens and what not just to be sure.

    But seriously, as frightening and disheartening as this may be, just remember this poll was conducted with adult interviewees. I live in the mountains of N.C. and most adults around here, whom I've shown microscope slides to, think I'm performing some sort of illusionary sorcery. They don't believe what they've seen and they certainly don't think it has any bearing on whether or not evolution occurred. My Mother-In-Law even inquired whether or not I could view heaven with my telescope. She smirked when she said it but I do believe she was sincere. By contrast, my children and their young friends, are enthralled by the view when they look down or up a lens, and they have so many good questions. So I'm not counting on a secular conversion en masse of the older generation, it's the children that give me hope for the future.

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 17:20:29 UTC | #945513

    caseyg5's Avatar Comment 30 by caseyg5

    Full frontal assaults on creationists don't work. Strategy needs to be employed. I have a hypothesis that should comfort them: God creates the universe to appear to have arisen through means that satisfies common sense and scientific testing. This way god lurks somewhere before the Big Bang, entirely disconnected from what we see now. Evolutionists are happy with fairy tale creation stories gone. Creationists are happy with god still there for them, being behind the curtains watching the universe evolve from afar and out of everyone's way, and they being relieved of not having to explain the ridiculous incongruities between facts and their fantasies. Like giving a binky to a screaming baby to shut them up!

    Now as science progresses in our understanding of the creation of the universe, over time god will be pushed further back away from the curtain through which creationists think It is peeking and can eventually end up out of the picture. That is of course unless one makes a conscious effort to be irrational but they are easy to pick out of the crowd!

    Mon, 04 Jun 2012 17:23:53 UTC | #945514