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← 'Draw Muhammad' artist placed on execution hit list; her online sites disappear

'Draw Muhammad' artist placed on execution hit list; her online sites disappear - Comments

weybourne's Avatar Comment 1 by weybourne

The "Religion of Peace" strikes again.

This makes me mad in ways I find extremely difficult to describe! I can't wait for next year's DMD.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 08:42:52 UTC | #489201

William T. Dawkins's Avatar Comment 2 by William T. Dawkins

This man is no leader! Let his statement speak for what he truly is.

William

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 09:02:49 UTC | #489207

TheRationalizer's Avatar Comment 3 by TheRationalizer

I liked this approach on youtube Have you seen this man?

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 09:47:50 UTC | #489216

Dirty Kuffar's Avatar Comment 4 by Dirty Kuffar

Lets get the online sites back up and stick 2 fingers up at the fundamentalists ! Its time more artists and comedians stepped up to the plate and started producing anti-islamist art that defends the freedoms and prosperity that they make use of.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 09:50:56 UTC | #489217

FreemasonFurbie's Avatar Comment 5 by FreemasonFurbie

I'm sorry, but this is getting ridiculous.

Updated: Fri, 16 Jul 2010 12:44:58 UTC | #489240

besleybean's Avatar Comment 6 by besleybean

The anti-Islamic stuff?
Well yes. People, can we concentrate on promoting freedom, rather than deliberately antagonising a particular group?

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 13:29:43 UTC | #489249

FreemasonFurbie's Avatar Comment 7 by FreemasonFurbie

Comment 6 by besleybean :

The anti-Islamic stuff?

Well yes. People, can we concentrate on promoting freedom, rather than deliberately antagonising a particular group?

Anti-Islamic on both sides is getting beyond ridiculous.

It is now getting to the point where they are so sensitive that any small event becomes a huge international affair and people on the opposing side feel the need to stand up, which brings us back to the starting point.

But putting someone on an execution list for starting a Facebook page is a step too far IMO.

It is a blatant warning to anyone who would stand up for free speech.

Updated: Fri, 16 Jul 2010 13:37:52 UTC | #489250

ZenDruid's Avatar Comment 8 by ZenDruid

Awlaki and his type are no more than rabble rousers who should be sequestered for the greater good. Troublemakers like these are poison for everybody.

Of course, that would also put the bright light on Pat Robertson, but to my knowledge, he has only declared fatwa on foreigners, and is technically beyond FBI jurisdiction. Fred Phelps is just too rat-clever to go that far; he mostly gloats at funerals.

Updated: Fri, 16 Jul 2010 14:04:42 UTC | #489252

MarkOnTheRiver's Avatar Comment 9 by MarkOnTheRiver

Comment 6 by besleybean :

[P]eople, can we concentrate on promoting freedom, rather than deliberately antagonising a particular group?

Yes of course. Besides, those islamists are big and scary, and don't really try to curtail our freedom of speech too much do they?

Instead, let's get back to bashing a few xtian ideologies. After all, they won't cut off our hands if we diss their prophet(s).

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 14:08:16 UTC | #489253

besleybean's Avatar Comment 10 by besleybean

Oh for goodness sake, nobody is against people protesting against those outrages. In fact I don't mind people protesting about anything at all and particularly the Christians at the moment. It was the sticking up 2 fingers, which i didn't think was the most mature response and I didn't want Furbie to be a lone voice. Tho if he really is a free mason ... But I've re-read comment no 4 and am happier with it now.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 14:34:04 UTC | #489258

MarkOnTheRiver's Avatar Comment 11 by MarkOnTheRiver

Comment 10 by besleybean :

Oh for goodness sake, nobody is against people protesting against those outrages.

I knew we'd be in agreement :o)

In fact I don't mind people protesting about anything at all and particularly the Christians at the moment.

Agreed, though a bit of a soft target.

It was the sticking up 2 fingers, which i didn't think was the most mature response and I didn't want Furbie to be a lone voice. Tho if he really is a free mason ...

. . . then yes, he has to acknowledge the existence of a supreme creator. (I'm sure he's being ironic though.)

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 14:45:32 UTC | #489260

Sean_W's Avatar Comment 12 by Sean_W

Wow, I hope that if I'm ever a target of the CIA that I'm comfortable enough to busy myself with Facebook campaigns.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 15:26:15 UTC | #489269

splumer's Avatar Comment 13 by splumer

As good of an idea as I thought the Draw Muhammed day was, I found a lot of the illustrations posted on their Facebook page really racist. If I was an Arab, I'd be pretty pissed.

That said, this guy just can't help perpetuating the stereotype, can he?

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 16:33:41 UTC | #489282

Zelig's Avatar Comment 14 by Zelig

Comment 4 by Dirty Kuffar :

Its time more artists and comedians stepped up to the plate and started producing anti-islamist art that defends the freedoms and prosperity that they make use of.

Comment 6 by besleybean :

The anti-Islamic stuff? Well yes. People, can we concentrate on promoting freedom, rather than deliberately antagonising a particular group?

  1. The word "Islamist" was used, not "Islamic". Pay attention.

  2. If you know of a way to genuinely "promote freedom" which will avoid being seen (by many Muslims and apologists) as "deliberately antagonising" Islam i'm sure we'd all love to hear it.

Updated: Fri, 16 Jul 2010 20:02:13 UTC | #489320

besleybean's Avatar Comment 15 by besleybean

Yeah ok David, we've already dealt with this.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 21:53:14 UTC | #489349

TeraBrat's Avatar Comment 16 by TeraBrat

Comment 6 by besleybean :

The anti-Islamic stuff? Well yes. People, can we concentrate on promoting freedom, rather than deliberately antagonising a particular group?

And ignore the death threats? What if you were the one they were threatening to kill? How about a little concern for the welfare of another human being.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 22:48:28 UTC | #489362

wald0h's Avatar Comment 17 by wald0h

Not everyone is a fifty year old PhD wielding cartoonist. If anyone was expecting a giant archive of philosophically ironic tasteful satire, well then I don't know how to console you. The point of draw muhammed day was to offend people. And it worked pretty well.

Sorry but extreme and moderate muslims alike need to suck it up and admit that they brought it on themselves. It's sad that people get threatened, hurt and murdered because of it, however the people doing it should have known full-well how the literalists would react and what they would do. If they aren't willing to stand up and accept the consequences then they really shouldn't be trying to advocate freedom of speech. The one thing I would gladly sacrifice myself for.

Fri, 16 Jul 2010 22:54:05 UTC | #489364

SolaVirtus's Avatar Comment 18 by SolaVirtus

I guess that this sort of depiction is offensive:

Lego

But what is more offensive, the act or the depiction?

Truth hurts. "They don't like it up 'em!"

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 05:15:43 UTC | #489439

SolaVirtus's Avatar Comment 19 by SolaVirtus

Our freedoms are under attack, and we must respond wisely and effectively.

When someone draws a cartoon, linking the behaviour of some Muslims with Mohammed, then what is more offensive, the behaviour or the depiction of that behaviour?

I am sure that these points do not need to be made for most of the contributors to this message board. However, it does seem that many of our politicians, religious leaders, and judiciary do not seem to understand the encroaching threat of Islam itself. Islamic terrorism is an acknowledged threat, but Islam itself - and the various other behaviours associated with it - is the main threat.

I have started a campaign to ensure that Members of Parliament have a correct understanding of Islam, and its threat to Britain and other nations where freedom must be preserved. Please help my efforts:

http://sola-virtus.blogspot.com/p/campaign.html

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 07:02:38 UTC | #489465

Cestriana's Avatar Comment 20 by Cestriana

It's inevitable that the act of poking fun at the Muslim prophet will incur the wrath of the myriad followers of that bizarre religion. I imagine that the mere making of these caricatures is perceived as a personal insult to the individual Muslim, hence the fury it unleashes in them.

Personally, I don't think it's worth the risk if, as a consequence of creating these drawings, you end up with a death threat hanging over you.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 08:54:41 UTC | #489483

besleybean's Avatar Comment 21 by besleybean

Well in an attempt to redeem myself after my earlier, possible over reaction. I am not entirely sure whether muslims feel the insult personally, on behalf of their prophet, or both. The former is flawed, but Islam really does not get it. They don't understand(or at least accept) that they do not have a right to be legally protected from personal offence.
They also want blasphemy laws, to protect their faith. Christianity has to take it's share of the blame here. We must not have any holy cows, that cannot be criticised or even questioned. As to the 2nd part of Cestriana's post. I personally greatly respect anybody who does put their life on the line, to stand up to fundamentalist bullying. It certainly should be an offence to issue a fatwah against somebody.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 10:36:45 UTC | #489500

Cestriana's Avatar Comment 22 by Cestriana

I guess what I'm trying to get at is:

Is this (the creating of caricatures) the best way to highlight the fundamental flaws of the Muslim religion and its culture? Does the act of taking the piss out of their prophet make Muslims think more objectively about what, for them, is their very reason for existence? I have my doubts. For this reason I imagine that they feel the act of mocking Muhammad is injurious to them personally.

Christians are much the same. They don't like being told by non-believers that Christianity is a load of old crap because this calls into question not only their belief system, but also their personal integrity.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 11:07:14 UTC | #489510

sandman67's Avatar Comment 23 by sandman67

Ch Ch Ch Ch Chicken, lay a little egg for me.

I hate it when heroes turn out to be paper tigers....dont you?

Terrorism: 1001 Reason: 0

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 11:47:11 UTC | #489521

besleybean's Avatar Comment 24 by besleybean

Which heroes and paper tigers are you referring to specifically? Further, sadly I think you're right in indicating that terrorism currently has the upper hand. But I wouldn't be so pessimistic over the score. Oh and Cestriana, believe me, I know where you're coming from. This was my very point about the " 2 fingers " comment, tho I later realised I possibly have to stop taking people so literally. But I think for me, the bottom lines are free speech and the right to disagree. This is what Islam fails to grasp. Nobody likes to admit their wrong, but hopefully some of us have the grace to do just that.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 12:20:49 UTC | #489526

Cestriana's Avatar Comment 25 by Cestriana

Yes, besleybean, I agree with you completely, both on the '2 fingers' comment and the freedom of speech issue.

Call me naive, folks, but while I do believe that everybody is entitled to mock Muhammad/Mohammed I still maintain that caricatures are futile, especially if their aim is to make a political point. RD et al go about their business in a much better and measured way: persuasion, reasoning and providing evidence to support their arguments.

That said, we all know the old adage: 'You can take a horse to water...' Followers of Islam have to want to ditch their superstitious nonsense. The trouble is that their religion/culture has them in such an iron grip it's really difficult for them to escape.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 13:25:34 UTC | #489546

-TheCodeCrack-'s Avatar Comment 26 by -TheCodeCrack-

Hey Cestriana

It depends on what the 'everybody draw Mohammad day' was attempting to achieve, and thus, success is dependent on that, therefor, these caricatures may or may not be futile.

Did everybody-draw-Mohammad day take the heat off of the south park creators? Was it a show of solidarity with them? Does it facilitate a new south park episode showing Mohammad properly this time, and not blanked out? If any of these things are true, it could be considered successful. There's many more things that I can think of that it may have achieved and that, therefor, may render it acceptable to declare it a success.

I think it was probably successful, not least in showing how huge the amount of people were who thought unacceptable the idea of blanking a cartoon character out.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 13:50:54 UTC | #489557

Agrajag's Avatar Comment 27 by Agrajag

@Roger Stanyard: I saw your avatar on this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DijcA6HKr8o&feature=related

;-) Steve

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 13:57:39 UTC | #489560

figureitout's Avatar Comment 28 by figureitout

Sorry, wrong topic, but I dont have time to find the right on or create the appropriate thread. just a thought... because creationists want their "theory " taught in schools and if this is given any credence, does that mean scientific evolutionary theories would be in the same legal category as religious theories, therefore scientific organisations could apply for tax exemption, just like churches. thoughts anyone.. or relegate this to an appropriate thread. Subversive I know, but perhaps worthy.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 14:04:55 UTC | #489564

Cestriana's Avatar Comment 29 by Cestriana

-TheCodeCrack -

Sure, you make a very good point about the solidarity issue and we do have to take a collective stand against the worst aspects of Islam.

I don't watch South Park, so can't comment about whether the heat was taken off the creators. My big concern is about the killing of innocent people as a consequence of coming up with these caricatures. You may recall that about 100 people died following the issue of the Danish ones.

I wouldn't like to ask their families if it was worth it.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 14:26:27 UTC | #489570

besleybean's Avatar Comment 30 by besleybean

Maybe we should. Anyhow the killings were wrong and it was certainly not the fault of the victims.

Sat, 17 Jul 2010 14:28:16 UTC | #489571