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Bill Nye the Science Guy - Comments

Jay G's Avatar Comment 1 by Jay G

I like his point about supporting science education in the elementary schools.

I never had a science teacher who was able to "turn me on" to science. I remember my High School Biology teacher. He was a gym teacher who was doing double-duty as a Biology teacher. I don't think he had any particular love of the subject and his lack of enthusiasm was passed on.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:01:45 UTC | #590823

TheRationalizer's Avatar Comment 2 by TheRationalizer

I liked this bit

And it's fine if you as an adult want to run around pretending or claiming that you don't believe in evolution, but if we educate a generation of people who don't believe in science, that's a recipe for disaster.

It's mainly people desperate to hold on to religious beliefs who deny evolution. My dad was in a doctors' waiting room and over heard the Muslim receptionist talking about how people are getting shorter over time. My dad asked her what would make her say such a thing, she told him that her religion told her that Noah was over 60 feet tall.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 11:10:06 UTC | #590831

CarlaTrumper's Avatar Comment 3 by CarlaTrumper

Bill Nye! Oh how he brings back memories, all good ones:)

I like this interview. Bill has a wonderful reputation in the states & is looked at by children and adults in a positive light. I'd like to see him on the national news circuit too, he may be able to help bridge the conversation gap regarding elementary & middle school science education.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 13:13:03 UTC | #590869

MajorTomWaits99's Avatar Comment 4 by MajorTomWaits99

Comment 3 by CarlaTrumper :

Bill Nye! Oh how he brings back memories, all good ones:)

I like this interview. Bill has a wonderful reputation in the states & is looked at by children and adults in a positive light. I'd like to see him on the national news circuit too, he may be able to help bridge the conversation gap regarding elementary & middle school science education.

Totally Agree. I also have fond memories of Bill Nye teaching me the basics of science. He could still be a powerful voice for children's education in the sciences.

He could become...a sort of Carl Sagan for Kids (moreso than he already is)

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 13:27:16 UTC | #590876

SoHelpMeReason's Avatar Comment 5 by SoHelpMeReason

Isn't he dead?

I've clearly been misinformed. Yeah, cool guy.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 14:34:10 UTC | #590906

David-in-Toronto's Avatar Comment 6 by David-in-Toronto

Comment 4 by MajorTomWaits99 :

Totally Agree. I also have fond memories of Bill Nye teaching me the basics of science. He could still be a powerful voice for children's education in the sciences.

He could become...a sort of Carl Sagan for Kids (moreso than he already is)

I believe Nye was an undergrad student of Sagan's at Cornell.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 16:26:07 UTC | #590952

cornbread_r2's Avatar Comment 7 by cornbread_r2

In my youth Mr. Wizard was the science guy.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 16:35:18 UTC | #590957

liberalartist's Avatar Comment 8 by liberalartist

The comments were a bit surprising, very negative/anti-evolution. One would expect more pro-science comments at Popular Mechanics. But I guess I shouldn't be surprised, engineers are not scientists - something I discovered after I started working at an engineering university. There was more free-thought going on at the Jesuit college I left than what I find here.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 16:37:09 UTC | #590960

DocWebster's Avatar Comment 9 by DocWebster

If it weren't for Bill Nye I never would have given a second thought to watching a video called Growing Up in the Universe. I never would have then bothered to watch Richard's talk at TED about the "queerer than we can suppose" universe and I certainly never would have thought that some old guy named Richard Feynman would have a thing to say that I would enjoy. I watched Carl Sagan on Cosmos as a kid but blew it all off before graduating high school because the science teachers I ran into were a soporific at the best of times. I think the greatest crime of my lifetime is that science has been reduced to a fight about religious convictions.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 16:48:09 UTC | #590966

zengardener's Avatar Comment 10 by zengardener

The comments on the original link are disturbing.

Bill Nye is an heroic teacher.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 17:06:37 UTC | #590969

Matt B's Avatar Comment 11 by Matt B

Bill Nye was definitely an amazing influence on children - as was Mr. Wizard (referenced by cornbread_r2, comment #7).

There is another show like this from around that era, called Beakman's World. I caught this recently while visiting friends out of state - the middle child (3 years old) was watching it and I was quickly drawn in.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 17:07:15 UTC | #590970

Geoff 21's Avatar Comment 12 by Geoff 21

Comment 2 The Rationaliser

her religion told her that Noah was over 60 feet tall.

We stand on the shoulders of giants! Rather the opposite of Kurt Vonnegut Jnr's sci-fi novel where Texans were getting constantly bigger whilst microscopic Chinese were to be found invading their bloodstreams.

It must have been one mother of an ark!

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 18:30:05 UTC | #591002

Randy Ping's Avatar Comment 13 by Randy Ping

I like Bill Nigh, he's a bit wacky but he reminds me of a great science teacher in elementery school that I had. His name was Guy Burnette, and he was one of the best all around educators that I had period. He was also our art teacher. He was not as wacky as Bill Nigh, but he used beaty to get us interested in scientific subjects. He would tell us to keep an eye out for science related stories and ask questions like "Did anyone watch anything on television or read anything related to science over the weekend? What was it about? What about it did you like?" and if it was something from the newspaper. He is the teacher that told us to check out Cosmos, when it ran on our local PBS station originally. Great teacher, never talked down to us, was very nice to the kids- nobody ever acted out badly in his class that I can remember, every kid respected and liked him. I wish every kid could have a science teacher in elementary school like him.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 20:16:55 UTC | #591030

MajorTomWaits99's Avatar Comment 14 by MajorTomWaits99

Comment 11 by Matt B :

Bill Nye was definitely an amazing influence on children - as was Mr. Wizard (referenced by cornbread_r2, comment #7).

There is another show like this from around that era, called Beakman's World. I caught this recently while visiting friends out of state - the middle child (3 years old) was watching it and I was quickly drawn in.

its new Jersey Bill NYE! I Remember Beakman's as well

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 20:34:40 UTC | #591037

Randy Ping's Avatar Comment 15 by Randy Ping

Comment 8 by liberalartist :

The comments were a bit surprising, very negative/anti-evolution. One would expect more pro-science comments at Popular Mechanics. But I guess I shouldn't be surprised, engineers are not scientists - something I discovered after I started working at an engineering university. There was more free-thought going on at the Jesuit college I left than what I find here.

yeah, a lot of the "scientists" who support ID are enginerds. So are a lot of the "scientists" who are used by climate change denialists in their arguments. Funny, eh?

I think it's because some of them see the world in a kind of []-ish way because of their field, and everything fits into the [] a certain way because somebody builds it that way. When they look at the fields outside of their own, they are still trying to apply that []-ish methodology to how they analyze data. Engineering is a science that asks "What do we want to do and how do we do it?" and everything they look at is centered around fitting it into that []. I wonder, though, if Engineering attracts more religious people for just that reason, it doesn't really ask the big questions about life, the universe and everything. It doesn't get too far into the territory of questions that upset their religious belief, it's non-threatening.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 20:37:37 UTC | #591040

Chrisss212's Avatar Comment 16 by Chrisss212

pretty short interview

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 22:13:10 UTC | #591072

blitz442's Avatar Comment 17 by blitz442

Comment 7 by cornbread_r2

What about Mr. JULIUS SUMNER MILLER!

My physics teacher in high school used to show us videos of JULIUS SUMNER MILLER! when he didn't feel like teaching, which was roughly 40% of time.

I wish I could say that I learned a lot of physics from these videos, but I mainly remember laughing hysterically at the manic, gesticulating, screaming, buck-toothed creature on the TV screen.

JULIUS SUMNER MILLER! was a good teacher, and physics was certainly his business, but perhaps he should have switched to decaf.

Fri, 11 Feb 2011 22:36:16 UTC | #591081

mordacious1's Avatar Comment 18 by mordacious1

Before he became famous, Bill was an actor on a Seattle comedy sketch show (Seattle, Almost Live!). On one show, Bill corrected the host when he pronounced "gigawatt" as "jigowatt". The host came back with, "Who do you think you are, Bill Nye the science guy"? The rest is history.

Sat, 12 Feb 2011 02:39:02 UTC | #591134

tboulay's Avatar Comment 19 by tboulay

Some of the comments after that article boil my blood.

It's not ignorance, it's stupidity. Maybe they don't know about ERV's, maybe they don't know about Pseudo-genes or the fusion of chromosome 2 in humans, or any other molecular genetic evidence that evolution is as much of a fact as gravity is.

Forget fossils, forget domestication, forget geographical distribution etc. etc. If you accept that courts convict people and in some cases sentence them to death based on DNA evidence, then I'm sorry, but I'm at the point where ignorance is no excuse. 20 minutes at http://www.cassiopeiaproject.com/ is enough to prove to anyone who is not stupid that evolution is an undeniable fact.

If someone says that they don't "believe" in evolution, they are stupid. Period. You may as well say that you don't believe in space or that you don't believe in light.

They're morons and they need to be laughed at, mocked, ridiculed and berated publicly at every possible opportunity.

Sat, 12 Feb 2011 03:59:13 UTC | #591144

Bernard Hurley's Avatar Comment 20 by Bernard Hurley

Comment 2 by TheRationalizer :

... she told him that her religion told her that Noah was over 60 feet tall.

How else could he have fed all those dinosaurs?

Sat, 12 Feb 2011 07:06:58 UTC | #591180

Bernard Hurley's Avatar Comment 21 by Bernard Hurley

Comment 19 by tboulay :

If someone says that they don't "believe" in evolution, they are stupid. Period. You may as well say that you don't believe in space or that you don't believe in light.

Well, they may also be ignorant, although for an adult that's only really an excuse if they come from a third world country. They could also be insane of dishonest. They could also be afraid, in some countries a fear of death, in others a fear of loosing their job or political office or reputation. Depending on the circumstances I might be more or less sympathetic. So if I wanted to make fun of creationists, I think I would want to choose my targets. However making fun of creationism is always a good thing in my book.

Sat, 12 Feb 2011 07:17:50 UTC | #591181

DavidXanaos's Avatar Comment 22 by DavidXanaos

The most comments on the linked article are so ridiculous.

Sat, 12 Feb 2011 08:18:51 UTC | #591190

Steve Hanson's Avatar Comment 23 by Steve Hanson

"A recent poll found that a majority of teachers in the U.S. are avoiding teaching evolution as a fundamental tenet of biology in the science classroom. We talked to science proponent and television star Bill Nye (the science guy) about what this means for U.S. education."

And I suppose teaching basic atomic structure to students would be as unnecessary in a chemistry classroom. Particle physics is JUST A THEORY, and it can all be as easily explained by the alternate (and equally valid, of course) theory of Godism (that is, god did it, end of story).

Sat, 12 Feb 2011 23:00:26 UTC | #591353

Tray Donovan's Avatar Comment 24 by Tray Donovan

Ken Hamm's rebuttal...

http://blogs.answersingenesis.org/blogs/ken-ham/2011/02/08/bill-nye-doesnt-understand-science/

Yikes.

Sun, 13 Feb 2011 19:27:29 UTC | #591545

tboulay's Avatar Comment 25 by tboulay

Ken Hamm's rebuttal...

http://blogs.answersingenesis.org/blogs/ken-ham/2011/02/08/bill-nye-doesnt-understand-science/

Yikes.

I should not have gone to that link.

Brutal.

Sun, 13 Feb 2011 22:56:17 UTC | #591588

WonderNerd's Avatar Comment 26 by WonderNerd

I remember Bill Nye! Good times. Good article too. Glad that somebody that the majority of the public likes is on the side of science.

Sun, 13 Feb 2011 23:38:28 UTC | #591605

RJ's Avatar Comment 27 by RJ

I was at the Arizona State University "Great Debate, What is Life?" last night. Richard Dawkins' , J. Craig Venter, Chris McKay, Lawrence Krauss, Lee Hartwell, Paul Davies, Roger Bingham, and Sidney Altman what a great debate. Large turnout; however there were plenty of Christian's believing they were there to debate abortion. They were so lost, well the group sitting next to my daughter and myself were. My daughter is a graduate of ASU with her BS in Biology and I am a chemist. We were both amused at the idea the Christians who attended had of this debate's purpose. I hope by the end of the debate they had a better understanding; however by comments made I believe they were lost. Yes lost Christians in a world of Science. We can only hope that they might google Richard Dawkins and read a book or two of his and no longer be lost. Thanks again Richard and thanks for celebrating Charles Darwins birthday with us at ASU. I think if Darwin were alive today he would be pleased with your desire to teach the facts to the world.

Mon, 14 Feb 2011 00:27:34 UTC | #591621

trip213's Avatar Comment 28 by trip213

Wow. according to Ken ham, we creationist deniers believe reptiles changed into birds. Did I miss the meeting in which dinosaurs were reclassified as reptiles?

Mon, 14 Feb 2011 03:48:11 UTC | #591651

keith.hart1's Avatar Comment 29 by keith.hart1

Nye: It's reluctance to change. It's wanting the world to be different than it is. And if you don't want the world to be different you are an unusual human being. We all want the world to be different. But to deny evolution is in no one's best interest.

As a 17 year old student in the State of Utah, USA, I have taken much interest in Biology, and, in turn, Evolution. These unsettling statistics about teaching the Theory are an absolute problem. Hopefully, one day soon, I will be able to have a contribution in such statistics, but for the better.

Mon, 14 Feb 2011 04:59:13 UTC | #591658

keith.hart1's Avatar Comment 30 by keith.hart1

Having just read the first chapter of, "The Greatest Show On Earth," let me correct my word usage in my previous comment -- "These unsettling statistics about teaching the Fact are an absolute problem."

Mon, 14 Feb 2011 09:17:35 UTC | #591699