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← Holy (roasted?) cow! My oven believes in God

Holy (roasted?) cow! My oven believes in God - Comments

LaurieB's Avatar Comment 1 by LaurieB

I hope you figured out how to shut the this option off otherwise you'll have an electric bill that will put you right into the poorhouse. Maybe you're just doomed for all eternity due to that Y chromosome linked aversion to reading instruction manuels. I wonder if that's an adaptation or just a spandrel.

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 14:25:49 UTC | #928314

zengardener's Avatar Comment 2 by zengardener

Your oven is obviously more tolerant of other cultures than you are. : )

On the other hand, being wildly wasteful for the sake of a superstitious belief is unacceptable.

I told this story to my mother, who was skeptical that such nonsense was possible. Challenged, I downloaded the operating manual and, sure enough, Sabbath mode is a setting.

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 15:21:54 UTC | #928335

TrickyDicky's Avatar Comment 3 by TrickyDicky

New technology putting the Shabbos goy out of work!

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 16:24:30 UTC | #928357

Mark Ribbands's Avatar Comment 4 by Mark Ribbands

Comment 1 by LaurieB I hope you figured out how to shut the option off …
Maybe you're just doomed for all eternity due to that Y chromosome linked aversion to reading instruction manuals. I wonder if that's an adaptation or just a spandrel.

My dear Laurie, I always find locating and operating a main switch (real or metaphorical) silences most opposition.

Yes, I am doomed for all eternity, but have been for years, so my oven should not take any special credit.

And thank you for introducing to me a new (Gouldian) word. I don’t like it much. The only spandrels I’ve encountered before are those over a door in the parlour of my old house in Norfolk which have Georgian dragons carved into them. Known as ‘Norfolk Snaps', they apparently ward off evil spirits and wooly thinking.

They have, mostly, been ineffective.

Comment 2 by zengardener Your oven is obviously more tolerant of other cultures than you are. : )

Perhaps. But again my oven should not take that as a special compliment. Most domestic appliances in my house are.

… Challenged, I downloaded the operating manual and, sure enough, Sabbath mode is a setting.

Mr Zen, I’m flattered by your attention to detail. Thank you. Does this count as peer review?

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 16:25:34 UTC | #928359

secularjew's Avatar Comment 5 by secularjew

This is hilarious. Reminds me of a story about the daughter of an acquaintance of ours. When she was very little, this girl attended an Orthodox religious school where she was taught about the importance of keeping kosher. So when shopping with her mother, this girl would always look for the "Kosher" label on products. One day, she came across a candy bar she really wanted, but she couldn't find the Kosher stamp anywhere on the packaging. She finally concluded, "Oh, they just forgot to put it on", and put the candy in the shopping cart (her mother didn't keep kosher, so she bought it). Your stove story reminded me of that girl. Obviously, if God is God, you can't fool him with these tricks (and opening the oven door still constitutes work whether the light goes on or not), but if you really want or need something bad enough, religious believers often compromise their own untenable beliefs and delude themselves into thinking that they haven't.

I'm also reminded of an old Jewish joke, where a priest and a rabbi are talking about witnessing God's miracles. The priest says how there was once a storm which destroyed the entire town, but through God's miracle, his church in the center of town remained unharmed. And the rabbi says, "Oh, I've got that beat. I was walking to the synagogue on Saturday and I saw a $100 bill lying on the ground right in front of me. I wanted to pick it up, but it's the Sabbath and we are not supposed to do any work. Then suddenly, for 10 feet all around me, it was Thursday."

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 17:22:14 UTC | #928379

LaurieB's Avatar Comment 6 by LaurieB

Mark,

There are many interesting kinds of spandrels all around us. I like to talk about the evolutionary kind here but I also like to get a look at the architectural kind too. In fact, I never miss an opportunity to check them out when touring through European cathedrals. It's the only reason this atheist will ever be found wandering around in a church.

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 17:45:20 UTC | #928388

DavidXanaos's Avatar Comment 7 by DavidXanaos

Hilarious, what a moron develops such a function. The manufacture company should be crucified by Greenpeace for their sins against the climate.

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 18:33:08 UTC | #928403

zengardener's Avatar Comment 8 by zengardener

Comment 5 by secularjew

Thank you for the hearty belly laugh.

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 19:53:55 UTC | #928431

nick keighley's Avatar Comment 9 by nick keighley

I use my mobile phone as an alarm clock. It is aware of weekends, so it doesn't wake me up at $VERY-EARLY in the moring on saturday and sunday. Do you find this cultural awareness equally irritating?

Sun, 18 Mar 2012 23:34:45 UTC | #928495

VrijVlinder's Avatar Comment 10 by VrijVlinder

Great thread, This is hardly new technology. I lived in Israel in a boarding school when I was a teen. On weekends (friday and saturday) we were allowed to go home or to friends or relatives. My parents were friends of some Mexican jews who emigrated to Israel and they agree to take me in on the weekends.

They were semi-orthodox, by that I mean that they were not black hat orthodox, but did conserve Sabbath and lived a kosher life. It was very disappointing that on my weekends and only time off from school I had to live like them. I was not a believer and felt it made no sense .

Everything in their apartment was wired for Sabbath. This was back in 1976. I wanted to be exempt from this but it was not possible, I asked the same question . They regard electricity and the use of it, or gas , to be work or energy. e=mc2 Work is forbidden you must rest. Like God Rested.

You can read however, and lay around. No TV , no Radio. I found it very odd how in modern day given technology advancement (and that was in 76!) that they would perpetuate a ritual to the degree of fooling themselves or relieving themselves from doing even the slightest thing as flip a switch. Yes the lights were on timers. Following ritual through the use of automation.

I was thinking this is like the Jetsons why can't every day be Sabbath and we don't have to do anything!!

Needless to say I begged my parents to find me some other family to stay with other than religious ones. They did. And those people turned out to be atheist lmao. Thank goodness.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 00:38:27 UTC | #928510

VrijVlinder's Avatar Comment 11 by VrijVlinder

@ secularjew: You are not supposed to carry money either, and if you go to the store right before Sabbath you must carry the exact change so you are not caught carrying money .

Also another observation as with the opening of the door being work, I agree. And the OP posted that he did push a button, now I think that just because it is a digital control panel, that pressing one button would not count as work, but everything goes if it is programmed to do so by Sabbath so you won;t have to. lol

I agree with the Kosher laws if applied to their time, they had no way of treating salmonella and other bacteria which is promoted by mixing certain food product. It has the strictest health quality control, or so they would like people to believe.

The principles can still serve today in gastronomy. Those aspects are not based in god or orthodox religion or ritual , more had to do with health and avoiding death from food and utensils.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 00:57:26 UTC | #928514

78rpm's Avatar Comment 12 by 78rpm

Oh, there will be lots of stories like these. The rabbi in our local synagogue was a heavy smoker. Problem---you can't light a fire on the sabbath; it's considered work. Can't srike a match or flick a lighter. How to avoid a nicotine fit for those 24 hours. Ah, but you are allowed to add fuel to a fire that is already burning. The gas stove had a pilot light, burning 24/7, of course, so when he turned on the burner, he was adding fuel (gas) to the fire already burning, and then touching the ciggie to that burner fire was just adding more fuel. Gotcha, you dumb Almighty Creator!

SAME RABBI--- Turning on the electric switch is also considered lighting a fire, and is by definition, work. You not only can't do work on the sabbath, you can't make your servant/slave do work either. What to do? Well, employed by the synagogue was what was called in those days a colored man, Jim. Jim knew his duty. He would follow the rabbi much of the day, and when the rabbi entered a dark room, he would comment--just a comment, mind you--"Whew! It sure is hard to see anything in here!" And Jim, not actually being commanded to work, just sort of agreeing with the concept, would flick on the electric light.

You can't make your ox work either, but we didn't have oxen in Chicago in those days.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 01:04:33 UTC | #928516

Sample's Avatar Comment 13 by Sample

My head exploded.

Mike

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 05:15:09 UTC | #928548

Haymaker's Avatar Comment 14 by Haymaker

On "Sabbath Mode" if you try and put a leg of pork or a gammon joint in it, does it refuse to cook it or does the oven door automatically come open and it gets pushed out onto the kitchen floor?

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 11:17:24 UTC | #928585

potteryshard's Avatar Comment 15 by potteryshard

I recall reading in an engtineering website about the adaptations to elevator control systems for Orthodox regions. The elevators are programmed to run continuously stopping at every floor so no has to commit the 'sin' of pushing a button. Conveniently ignoring the much more significant sin of wastefullness.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 12:21:16 UTC | #928598

BenS's Avatar Comment 16 by BenS

On a related note, it's always amused me just how stupid the concept of eruv is and just how stupid the people who 'observe' it must think their god is.

"We're not allowed to move things from one domain to another! We can't carry it from the house into the street. What are we going to do?!?!?"
"Ehhh, put some wire up around the town and call the entire thing one domain."
"Don't you think our omniscient overlord will see through that ruse...?"
"Naaaahhhhh....."

Imbecility of the highest order.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 12:22:50 UTC | #928599

Mr DArcy's Avatar Comment 17 by Mr DArcy

Is there a Ramadan mode or a Lent mode?

No eating for 40 days! Guaranteed weight loss, or your money back.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 15:25:38 UTC | #928638

SaganTheCat's Avatar Comment 18 by SaganTheCat

bit like my stereo, it often plays Sabbath but never ramadanadingdon

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 16:46:39 UTC | #928660

VrijVlinder's Avatar Comment 19 by VrijVlinder

The adaptation of technology for the purpose of perpetuating ancient ritual that no longer applies due to the irrelevance of the behavior in modern times, is quite baffling.

@Comment 14 by Haymaker On "Sabbath Mode" if you try and put a leg of pork or a gammon joint in it, does it refuse to cook it or does the oven door automatically come open and it gets pushed out onto the kitchen floor?

That is hilarious lmao !!!

I think the oven should have goyim mode no?

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 17:54:06 UTC | #928684

Alan4discussion's Avatar Comment 20 by Alan4discussion

Comment 19 by VrijVlinder

The adaptation of technology for the purpose of perpetuating ancient ritual that no longer applies due to the irrelevance of the behavior in modern times, is quite baffling.

I've just been sorting out some dumb-tech devices earlier this month.. They refused to recognise leap years!

Just think yourselves lucky you did not get the Muslim version of the cooker, fridge and bed! Ramadan (Arabic: رمضان‎ Ramaḍān, IPA: [rɑmɑˈdˤɑːn]; variations Persian: Ramazan‎) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, which lasts 29 or 30 days. It is the Islamic month of fasting, in which participating Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, smoking and sex during daylight hours

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 18:27:44 UTC | #928694

VrijVlinder's Avatar Comment 21 by VrijVlinder

How about our modern day prayer mats, with built in technology like GPS and a built in iPad so you can google earth Mecca for a "being there experience", the affordable version comes with built in compass.Hi tech prayer mat

The Hindu version of the oven contains robotic arms that also prepare and serve the meal. It is called the Vishnu-matic .

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 19:45:58 UTC | #928715

Mark Ribbands's Avatar Comment 22 by Mark Ribbands




What delicious responses! Often hilarious as well. It’s instructive to hear from those who understand the rationale (if that’s the right word) behind the programming, and can relate details of other crafty hell-avoidance schemes.

I had no idea it was all so absurd; beyond satire even. For once, these are stories you really couldn’t make up. Are there any more?

Some interesting comments about waste. The device is well-insulated so it’s probably not as bad as all that. Until of course you start opening and closing the door …

Comment 14 by Haymaker On "Sabbath Mode" if you try and put a leg of pork or a gammon joint in it, does it refuse to cook it or does the oven door automatically come open and it gets pushed out onto the kitchen floor?

I have no idea. Please arrange for a fine leg of pork to be delivered to my house and I’ll let you know.

But I tell you what: the oven does have some specific instructions on how to make crispy crackling. There’s even a program for this particular sin, involving a bizarre water-mist contrivance. So Mr Miele is nothing if not inclusive.

Comment 9 by Nick Keighley I use my mobile phone as an alarm clock. It is aware of weekends, so it doesn't wake me up VERY-EARLY in the morning on Saturday and Sunday. Do you find this cultural awareness equally irritating?

I’m not sure what your point is, but yes, I suppose I do :)

And that’s why I arrange my life to resist the foul tyranny of the alarm clock as much as possible: the silly, presumptuous things with their absurd, smug, beep-beep-beeping.

(Just in case it’s not entirely clear I was being linguobuccal in the OP: it’s not the right-on ‘cultural awareness’ displayed by my oven which offends me, only her stupidity.)

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 20:00:23 UTC | #928720

nick keighley's Avatar Comment 23 by nick keighley

          [Comment 11](/discussions/645307-holy-roasted-cow-my-oven-believes-in-god/comments?page=1#comment_928514) by  [VrijVlinder](/profiles/189092)          :


                 @ secularjew: You are not supposed to carry money either, and if you go to the store right before Sabbath you must carry the exact change so you are not caught carrying money .Also another observation as with the opening of the door being work, I agree. And the OP posted that he did push a button, now I think that just because it is a digital control panel, that pressing one button would not count as work, but everything goes if it is programmed to do so by Sabbath so you won;t have to. lolI agree with the Kosher laws if applied to their time, they had no way of treating salmonella and other bacteria which is promoted by mixing certain food product. It has the strictest health quality control, or so they would like people to believe.The principles can still serve today in gastronomy. Those aspects are not based in god or orthodox religion or ritual , more had to do with health and avoiding death from food and utensils.

do you actually have any evidence that Jewish dietry law reduces salmonella infections? For instance the Vietnamese eat pork and they come from a very hot and humid country

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 22:25:26 UTC | #928757

nick keighley's Avatar Comment 24 by nick keighley

          [Comment 19](/discussions/645307-holy-roasted-cow-my-oven-believes-in-god/comments?page=1#comment_928684) by  [VrijVlinder](/profiles/189092)          :


                 The adaptation of technology for the purpose of perpetuating ancient ritual that no longer applies due to the irrelevance of the behavior in modern times, is quite baffling.

seriously? My newspaper still publishes horoscopes. Pretty much all technology has some sort of cultural bias. You're just saying you don't like certain cultures.

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 22:28:49 UTC | #928759

DefenderOfReason!'s Avatar Comment 25 by DefenderOfReason!

If you want a good laugh at how ridiculous this Sabbath crap can be, watch this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcEXGu77DkM

Mon, 19 Mar 2012 23:26:28 UTC | #928774

VrijVlinder's Avatar Comment 26 by VrijVlinder

@nick keighley: Oh? I do not think I said that at all. Horoscopes? Since when have they become religion? ....technology has no bias, those who use it do. And those who use it to perpetuate ancient rituals no longer relevant to maintain the status quo are absurd.

whether I like it or not is irrelevant .

Tue, 20 Mar 2012 05:11:40 UTC | #928822

hairybreeks's Avatar Comment 27 by hairybreeks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabbath_mode

Tue, 20 Mar 2012 11:42:40 UTC | #928912

78rpm's Avatar Comment 28 by 78rpm

[Comment 16 >

"We're not allowed to move things from one domain to another! We can't carry it from the house into the street. What are we going to do?!?!?""Ehhh, put some wire up around the town and call the entire thing one domain.""Don't you think our omniscient overlord will see through that ruse...?""Naaaahhhhh....."

In the town where I worked there were a lot of orthodox Jews. They prevailed upon the local zoning board, who were always careful not to abrade the thin skins of religions, to allow them to string one of these wires around a large part of the town, where there was more than one congregation. Their explanation, as I understand it, of why it was vital to them was not so much moving domains as the fact that they couldn't drive on the sabbath, nor push a baby buggy, which was "work," so with the wire paralleling the power lines, the whole damn town was their home, and now they could bring the kid with them to the synagogue. (Of course, they could have hired a sitter, being careful to pay in advance, not on the actual sabbath, but that wasn't their approach to the problem.)

Tue, 20 Mar 2012 12:21:01 UTC | #928918

hungarianelephant's Avatar Comment 29 by hungarianelephant

Comment 22 by Mark Ribbands :

I had no idea it was all so absurd; beyond satire even. For once, these are stories you really couldn’t make up. Are there any more?

Oh yes indeed. How long have you got?

Jewish dietary requirements also forbid the consumption of an animal "in the milk of its mother". What this practically means is that you can't have meat in milk sauces. Although it's ok to have chicken supreme, because as everyone knows, chicken is a kind of fish.

To be properly orthodox, however, not only can you not mix milk and meat. You also cannot allow them to come into contact with the same equipment. The practical solution is therefore to have two separate sets of pots - one of which cannot be used for milk, and the other cannot be used for meat.

But after that, it gets a bit tricky, because you have to use different pots and utensils for Pesach, and the same rules still apply. Thus you end up with four sets of pots. My ultra-orthodox colleague refused to deny that they are colour-coded.

My Jewish ex-gf was happy to eat pepperoni pizza, but only out of the cardboard or on paper plates. It was not allowed to come into contact with the normal plates. I couldn't help thinking she had rather missed the point of all this kosher stuff.

What's particularly baffling about intricate Jewish rules is that you are not actually required to believe in any of this nonsense. You merely have to follow the rules. It is ritual - and a ritual that has been vigorously preserved and defended for thousands of years. I wonder sometimes whether this is what most of religion really comes down to, and whether actually believing things and arranging your life around then is the deviant behaviour.

Tue, 20 Mar 2012 13:12:26 UTC | #928924

Jonathan Dore's Avatar Comment 30 by Jonathan Dore

Why would it be breaking the commandment to cause an electrical current to make the light come on, but not breaking it to cause a current to pass continuously through the heating element for 72 HOURS?

72 hours of heat is a whole lot more work for someone than a few seconds of light.

And if we're to define "work" in such footling ways, why isn't walking considered work? Or chewing? Or digesting? They all consume calories.

Tue, 20 Mar 2012 22:03:10 UTC | #929104