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MsChelle's Avatar Joined almost 2 years ago
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Go to: Study: US College Students Advance Little Intellectually

MsChelle's Avatar Jump to comment 17 by MsChelle

Red Dog, do you have any children who are still in K-12, do you teach, are any of your siblings teacher? If not, then I understand why you may not yet be familiar with creative writing, but it does exist in today's schools and kids are given credit for it.

Having been an office employee for nearly 30 years, I am all too familiar with technological advancements in the workplace, but it's not about penmanship, it's about fine motor skills and spatial skills.

Due to an accident on the field hockey field, I suffered nerve damage to my left digital nerve. Without the use of cursive handwriting, I may not have ever been able to fully regain the use of my left-hand.

http://blog.childandfamilydevelopment.com/blog/sensory-integration-through-play/why-cursive-writing-is-still-important

Tue, 01 May 2012 16:08:01 UTC | #938718

Go to: Unbelief in the pews

MsChelle's Avatar Jump to comment 249 by MsChelle

I have often thought that the one whom we call God is nothing more than our own self-conscious - kind of like the angel and devil on the shoulders of cartoon characters who are trying to decide whether to do something or not.

My son is sixteen and considers himself to be an atheist, but has on occasion attended services with his friends - just to hang out with them, not because he has doubts about his atheism. Some of his Christian friends have stayed his friend, but others have let their parents' ignorance and hatred influence whether they associate with him or not (which has causes my son to remind them just how un-Christian their decision to disassociate with him really is).

Anyway, I think a lot who have doubts are there more for fellowship than for salvation.

Tue, 01 May 2012 15:45:47 UTC | #938710

Go to: Religion is not the disease - lack of education is

MsChelle's Avatar Jump to comment 187 by MsChelle

Every highly educated Christian that I know believes in the scientific evidence of evolution, but also understands and accepts that not everything in life can be explained away by science. I think they just want to know where we come from as well as who we are.

Tue, 01 May 2012 15:29:49 UTC | #938704

Go to: Bibles in schools

MsChelle's Avatar Jump to comment 23 by MsChelle

Comment 4 by Bobwundaye :

I've taught at a school (with religious foundations) where the Gideons handed out the Bibles and they always delivered an uplifting message of hope.

I've also seen the bibles land up in trash cans right outside the chapel as some students decided to protest that way, and seen other students pore over their bibles sucking up every word as they try to make sense of the world and find meaning in life. And I've seen the rebellious kids become evangelical, and the religious ones, cynical almost-atheists (not strictly atheists yet).

By and large, we underestimate children's ability to express themselves and make their own decisions and revisit them.

The version of the Bible that the Gideons gave out where I worked was a fairly accessible translation of the New Testament which in my opinion should probably be required reading anyway (or at least parts of it), even in a secular education.

I couldn't agree with you more - all of us should be required learn about all of the beliefs that are out there, even if it means reading what we don't necessarily believe in.

I personally cannot stand Sci-Fi Fantasy, but I would be laughed straight out the door if I attempted to protest its existence at my son's school the way that non-believers protest the Bible.

In reality, there is no separation of church and state here in America. It is not written in any of our legal documents. It was just something that was mentioned in one of Thomas Jefferson's personal letters - not of our legal documents, just a personal letter that others have misquoted as law. Comments written in personal letters are not laws, they are just comments written in personal letters.

The Bible doesn't hurt people unless it somehow falls and hits someone in the process. It's people who hurt people. Whether someone believes what is written or not, byy reading the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, the Qur'an, the Bhagavad Gita, the Holy Books of Thelema, etc., a person can gain a greater understanding, greater tolerance, and greater love for his/her fellow human beings.

Tue, 01 May 2012 15:16:56 UTC | #938699

Go to: Highly Religious People Are Less Motivated by Compassion Than Are Non-Believers

MsChelle's Avatar Jump to comment 9 by MsChelle

One of my 4th great-grandfathers was a Quaker who became excommunicated after paying a military tax and marrying outside of the Society. Afterwards, he went on to establish a Free Christian Church in Philly. In the nine generations since him, we as parents have positively educated our children about all beliefs - not just Christian. So, it is not unlike me to vehemently defend anyone who is being bullied for their beliefs.

In my lifetime, I have at times thought that God was real, and when visible, he looked like the image painted on the Sistine Chapel and I've also thought that God was real, but looked more like my brain processing self-conscious thought. Whenever someone questions God's existence, I very often ask if they have ever considered that he might just be their self-conscious. It has made them think.

Anyway, I have seen many life-long church members, agnostics, and atheist display apathy and hatred toward those who are not like them. So, I don't think it is necessarily something based upon a person's level of religious belief. Compassion is something that I think we all feel should just come naturally, but may actually be more influenced by what others teach us, rather than how we should naturally react.

So, because there are un-compassionate believers and non-believers, I think that it's more a matter of being less compassionate because you've been taught to be that way, rather than being less compassionate because you are deeply devout in your religious beliefs.

Tue, 01 May 2012 14:41:29 UTC | #938684

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