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davidpercival's Profile

davidpercival's Avatar Joined over 4 years ago
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Latest Discussions Started by davidpercival

Inhertitance of Acquired Behaviour Adaptions and Brain Gene Expression in Chickens - last commented 19 November 2010 11:24 PM

Evolution and Animal Behaviour - last commented 14 August 2010 08:57 AM

Behaviour/Instincts/Genes - last commented 11 August 2010 10:58 AM

More Discussions by davidpercival

Latest Comments by davidpercival

Go to: Altruism and the evolution of bigger brains

davidpercival's Avatar Jump to comment 70 by davidpercival

What I meant by saying that the waggle dance is not inherited genetically was that the system of communication amongst honey bees i.e the instinct to perform and understand it has not been proved to be genetically inherited. While looking at your reference I have also noted recent research showing that other sub species which separated hundreds of thousands of years ago can understand each others dance while being comparatively distant in terms of genes ( I will comment again to give the reference when I have more time.)

i accept that instinct plays a greater role for insects and reptiles but my point was that there is a lack of evidence that instict is genetically based. To return to the birds again, no "how to build a nest" genes have been discovered.

I think the lioness and the baby gnu do not indicate one way or another on this discussion, but is very interesting in itself.

Wed, 14 Mar 2012 23:28:03 UTC | #927155

Go to: Altruism and the evolution of bigger brains

davidpercival's Avatar Jump to comment 67 by davidpercival

Comment 65 by DavidMcC. You are missing the point I'm afraid. No one has shown that bees in herit the waggle dance genetically. Neither have they shown that reptiles inherit their behaviour genetically. In mammals there are plenty of instances of "automatic" behaviour which are often called instincts. Even in humans, if you put your finger in the hand of a baby it will grasp it instinctively.

You are so used to genetic and inheritance meaning the same thing you do not understand that there is no evidence that genes have anything to do with such behaviour.

Loved the gnu video. Amazing.

Wed, 14 Mar 2012 14:34:40 UTC | #926953

Go to: Altruism and the evolution of bigger brains

davidpercival's Avatar Jump to comment 64 by davidpercival

I am not saying that behaviour is not inherited in some way, otherwise birds wouldn't know how to build nests, for example, but I am simply saying that there is no evidence that it is inherited genetically. It seems damned silly to me to say that behaviour is inherited genetically when there is no evidence of it.

Tue, 13 Mar 2012 19:04:04 UTC | #926744

Go to: Altruism and the evolution of bigger brains

davidpercival's Avatar Jump to comment 62 by davidpercival

I personally know identical twins whose behaviour and attitudes are totally different. If genes controlled behaviour they should act in exactly the same way.

It could be that it is a difficult thing to prove because it is not true.

Billions af pounds (and dollars) have been spent on genetics and it has not delivered on the promises that were made for it. There is more evidence through proper trials for extra sensory perception than there is for genes causing behaviour yet all the true believers on this site dismiss ESP as impossible yet go on about genes causing altruism or whatever as though it is a fact. Where are the skeptics when you need them.

Tue, 13 Mar 2012 16:55:17 UTC | #926717

Go to: Altruism and the evolution of bigger brains

davidpercival's Avatar Jump to comment 59 by davidpercival

Except that there is practically no evidence that genes control behaviour. It is an assumption that is accepted because people keep saying it is true without evidence. A bit like religion really.

Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:42:38 UTC | #926421

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