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Comments by Vicktor

Go to: Women cane morality police

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 16 by Vicktor

I think we're all missing something obvious here. These women may have objected to the particular interpretation of Sharia law that was enforced on them, but that's a far cry from renouncing or even acknowledging the overall stupidity of Islam and its practices. Wait a minute, Islam is essentially a practice!

Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:46:05 UTC | #907259

Go to: Women cane morality police

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 3 by Vicktor

Comment 2 by CdnMacAtheist

They may be manhandled and subjected to virginity tests.

Wed, 11 Jan 2012 07:35:22 UTC | #907172

Go to: The rise of atheism in Pakistan

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 24 by Vicktor

Comment 23 by Vicktor

That's dawn until dusk. :P

Tue, 10 Jan 2012 05:39:06 UTC | #906803

Go to: The rise of atheism in Pakistan

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 23 by Vicktor

Comment 22 by Functional Atheist

Don't forget that most Muslims in the Islamic world are also forced to worship endlessly or face the consequences of that. "Liberal" Muslims, like atheists, are often not tolerated because one implies the other. Not by their families, friends or society. Your ass had better not be seen outside a mosque on Friday afternoons! You had better not be seen eating or drinking from dusk until dawn during the month of Ramadhan! When someone gives you an Islamic greeting, you had better be heard responding appropriately!

Tue, 10 Jan 2012 05:21:45 UTC | #906801

Go to: The rise of atheism in Pakistan

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 21 by Vicktor

Not a word about the insanity of the unequivocally compulsory daily prayers in Islam. I guess it's a topic even atheist Pakistanis dare not touch. Before I wonder if a god exists, I would wonder why he demands what he demands. If that doesn't make sense, then I'd move on to the question of his existence.

Tue, 10 Jan 2012 03:58:04 UTC | #906797

Go to: A science news preview of 2012

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 11 by Vicktor

Comment 2 by neverstopjamin

Hey but I do have a handheld device that can direct me to almost anywhere, find me answers to almost any question, and contact anyone else with similar device, not forgetting games music and video. That's pretty good going I suppose..

Assuming medical science one day discovers that all those waves permeating us and our surroundings causes cancer or some other kind of disease, I can't help but think that their "solution" to the problem would be to advise us all to give up using our mobile devices, or use them "in moderation". :) So don't get hooked! Assume some responsibility for your health!

Thu, 05 Jan 2012 02:56:20 UTC | #905423

Go to: Stephen Hawking: driven by a cosmic force of will

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 1 by Vicktor

Even though he retains a youthful complexion, the devastating impact of the disease that has ravaged his body for almost 50 years is all too apparent.

At least physicists have made some significant progress in their fields in the last 50 years. Maybe a cure will come when he's 120.

Tue, 03 Jan 2012 23:47:30 UTC | #905116

Go to: A science news preview of 2012

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 10 by Vicktor

Comment 2 by neverstopjamin

Hey but I do have a handheld device that can direct me to almost anywhere, find me answers to almost any question, and contact anyone else with similar device, not forgetting games music and video. That's pretty good going I suppose..

I'm still waiting for the model that comes with a phaser built in.

Tue, 03 Jan 2012 08:59:42 UTC | #904823

Go to: Secular Guidelines to Moral Living: A Tribute to Christopher Hitchens

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 30 by Vicktor

Comment 29 by Jeff Schweitzer

I expect science to come up with results worth all the money we're spending on it, and to stop wasting even more money telling us to lose weight and exercise. And no, I don't expect to always have to eat well. I expect one day to be able to eat and drink as I please (with impunity). Is there any reason you think I should be denied this empowerment?

Fri, 30 Dec 2011 04:44:10 UTC | #903710

Go to: Secular Guidelines to Moral Living: A Tribute to Christopher Hitchens

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 26 by Vicktor

Comment 21 by Stafford Gordon

Name something in nature/life that doesn't have a trade off please.

Something significant may take time or money to achieve but not necessarily involve pain and suffering. For instance, I'd happily pay to supercharge my immune system than have to diet and exercise the rest of my life.

Fri, 30 Dec 2011 00:11:49 UTC | #903664

Go to: Secular Guidelines to Moral Living: A Tribute to Christopher Hitchens

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 25 by Vicktor

Comment 18 by Jeff Schweitzer

Victor, hard to see how striving to achieve leads to complacency. In my world at least we can never escape the fundamental need to accept personal responsibility for our actions; science can empower us if we make the choice to take what is available and use it to good purpose.

It's quite easy to see. For instance, many, if not most medical scientists today probably believe that it is your responsibility to maintain good health than it is theirs to cure you. We often buy into this idea too because it seems "irresponsible" of us not to. They are more likely to apply for an "easy" research grant investigating (yet again) something related to diet and exercise than something that attempts to actually cure a major disease. If I think of the amount of money that has been spent on "research" that essentially just tells us (again) to eat less and exercise more - not to mention the money on all the campaigns to "educate" the public on these matters - I shudder to think what could have been achieved if all that money was focused on research that actually aimed to use science and technology to cure major diseases. So here you have your complacency. Even when it comes to high-tech "solutions" (which diet and exercise are not), they are usually focused on prevention and the responsibility is passed, once again, to us (to come in for frequent check-ups). I sometimes wonder what the world of medicine might be like if a patient could not be blamed, in any way whatsoever, for the condition of their health.

Comment 19 by ccr5Delta32

@ Vicktor I would have to disagree with you somewhat .i think our resent spate in longevity is due more to our lifestyles ,the quality and nutrition of a more widely available food source together with better sanitation rather than medical advances with some notable exceptions ,antibiotics and vaccines for example .

I think you are actually agreeing with me that this is the problem. In the so-called "advanced" world of medical science, the best they can do for us healthwise is to tell us to diet and exercise. It's too bad we are not living in a world where medical science had say, learned to supercharge the human immune system (how many are even looking into something like this?). Hitchens might have lived another 30 years, easily. And accomplished who knows what.

Thu, 29 Dec 2011 23:30:44 UTC | #903653

Go to: Secular Guidelines to Moral Living: A Tribute to Christopher Hitchens

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 13 by Vicktor

Comment 12 by Jeff Schweitzer

I don't think you'll ever escape the reality that great achievement requires some pain and sacrifice in one form or another.

According to which deity, exactly?

But I would say that is more the exception than the rule. If something is easy, it is often (not always) mundane, and therefore potentially less interesting.

This kind of thinking also (perhaps ironically) leads to complacency. For instance, why bother striving to find bona fide cures to diseases when it's so much easier to just keep telling people to be more "responsible" (what they eat and how much, who they have sex with, how they have sex, not to smoke, when and how much to exercise etc.) - as if they didn't already have enough on their plate and should always be willing to accept more "responsibilities". Science and technology should be used to empower us, not disempower us.

Thu, 29 Dec 2011 05:57:59 UTC | #903465

Go to: Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani could be hanged in Iran

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 71 by Vicktor

Islam "works" so long as everyone is either following it or under its rule. Even though things could be better in such a scenario, there would be a certain level of peace preserved. To Muslims, freedom and dissenters are the problem. Too bad for Muslims that they're now living in a world with relatively easy access to other places and points of view. So Islam today is like a car but without the engine. It can still move (wheels etc.) but it's just not worth it. So it tries to smash everyone else's car or shout at them as they whizz by.

Thu, 29 Dec 2011 01:42:24 UTC | #903438

Go to: Secular Guidelines to Moral Living: A Tribute to Christopher Hitchens

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 7 by Vicktor

What's all this "no pain no gain" nonsense? I hope medical science doesn't subscribe to this. Everyone, especially scientisits, should be striving to come up with technologies that give us the maximum gain while eliminating pain completely. There is no reason we should expect to suffer for everything we get. It's a bad attitude and philosophy to have, in my view. Just because it's been that way for much of human history, doesn't mean we should always concede to it.

Wed, 28 Dec 2011 22:43:22 UTC | #903405

Go to: Atheist Spirituality by a former Muslim Apologist.

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 24 by Vicktor

There is no religion (nor has there ever been, I think) more obsessed with compulsory worship and servitude than Islam. Congratulations on having had the courage to leave the madness. Enjoy the fresh, refreshing air of freedom; whatever remains of it for you, and regardless of how much of it was stolen from you. Use the extra energy, time and money to do some real good in the world. That, my friend, is true "spirituality".

Tue, 27 Dec 2011 04:19:46 UTC | #902900

Go to: In Memoriam: Christopher Hitchens, 1949–2011

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 483 by Vicktor

Comment 481 by GeeBee

@ Vicktor

I have been secretly hoping he chose to be cryogenically frozen so that he could be re-animated when there were more intelligent people around. :)

I doubt it. I distinctly recall him implying, if not actually saying, on more than one occasion, that he was against the concept of human immortality.

Thu, 22 Dec 2011 02:46:34 UTC | #901842

Go to: In Memoriam: Christopher Hitchens, 1949–2011

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 479 by Vicktor

Was Hitchens buried (if so, where?) or cremated?

Wed, 21 Dec 2011 02:27:54 UTC | #901556

Go to: Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011)

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 31 by Vicktor

Inspiring.

Mon, 19 Dec 2011 07:55:47 UTC | #900872

Go to: LHC: Higgs boson 'may have been glimpsed'

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 34 by Vicktor

Comment 33 by Alex, adv. diab.

I for one surely don't need your cheers. But still, come on, lighten up a little, why so dreary? What will ever be an opportunity for you to cheer about, I wonder.

I don't know... how about when a significant finding is actually confirmed?

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 00:17:38 UTC | #899055

Go to: LHC: Higgs boson 'may have been glimpsed'

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 32 by Vicktor

Comment 20 by Alex, adv. diab.

Vicktor, you are annoying. You keep griping about all the announcements of preliminary results and how you are bored by them because they are too tenuous, and when a real one seems to come up, you start being cynical about that because it's not good enough. I think you don't care about the stuff either way, and just want to complain.

Just because I'm an atheist, don't expect me to be a cheerleader for science even when there's nothing (yet) to cheer about. If scientists need to be cheered on at every turn even when they've accomplished nothing significant, we have a bleak future ahead of us.

Thu, 15 Dec 2011 00:09:57 UTC | #899049

Go to: Saudi woman beheaded for 'sorcery'

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 56 by Vicktor

Comment 45 by Thisisgodspeaking

Witchcraft in the Islamic world invariably involves three things; chicken bones, feathers, and bits of paper. Possessing these three items together is alone enough to convict. I read it in the local papers ( Kuwait) at least once a month.

I kid you not when a Muslim friend told me that he had first hand experience of witchcraft. His brother, on holiday in Casablanca, was put under an infatuation spell by a gorgeous, young Morrocan witch. For two months he refused to return home to his 400 lb wife! They broke the spell after they discovered a piece of chicken bone under the sofa, feathers under the bed, and bits of paper with scribbles under the wardrobe in his holiday apartment and burnt them all together.. He returned to his corpulent wife two weeks later...... after he ran out of money and had to go back to work! And this from the mouth of a highly qualified, UK educated engineer. It simply boggles the mind!

Indeed. If he was a non-Western educated engineer it would make perfect sense.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 02:55:19 UTC | #898773

Go to: LHC: Higgs boson 'may have been glimpsed'

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 17 by Vicktor

These physicists must be shitting in their pants that they have yet a single, confirmed, significant scientific finding to show for their expensive toy. At least the media is doing all they can to help.

Wed, 14 Dec 2011 02:49:00 UTC | #898772

Go to: Saudi woman beheaded for 'sorcery'

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 38 by Vicktor

"Practicing witchcraft" to them may be something as trivial as reading the Koran backwards or owning a pentagram. It may even be as offensive to them (probably more so) as possessing kiddie porn pictures is to us.

Tue, 13 Dec 2011 07:47:01 UTC | #898497

Go to: Islam, Charles Darwin and the denial of science

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 41 by Vicktor

Comment 40 by Gomer

The rejection of the theory of evolution by certain medical students on the basis of religious belief has precisely that implication. Where, exactly, do they stop letting their religion influence or interfere with their study and practice of medicine?

Thu, 08 Dec 2011 03:31:01 UTC | #896673

Go to: Islam, Charles Darwin and the denial of science

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 38 by Vicktor

Comment 37 by Gomer

Would he also do his best for every patient or conveniently be resigned to the idea that the patient's "time had come" or that it was "God's will" every now and then?

Thu, 08 Dec 2011 03:09:06 UTC | #896668

Go to: Islam, Charles Darwin and the denial of science

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 36 by Vicktor

I wonder how medicine is taught in Muslim or Muslim-majority countries. No wonder their degrees are not recognized and they prefer to study in the West.

Thu, 08 Dec 2011 02:22:43 UTC | #896663

Go to: BBC Asia Network discussion on Islam and evolution

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 18 by Vicktor

Do you really expect Muslims to simply flush down the toilet a lifetime of daily worship? Not to mention a small fortune spent in the name of their religion.

Wed, 07 Dec 2011 01:14:26 UTC | #896335

Go to: Enhancement Anxiety

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 5 by Vicktor

...might not generalize to more radical technologies that could reverse the aging process, dramatically increase our cognitive capacities, alter the gross morphology of human bodies...

I really don't see any of these happening any time soon. Especially the first and last ones. You could probably count the number of research groups around the world seriously tackling the first "problem" on just one hand. A wise man once said: "Philosophy is to science what pornography is to sex."

Thu, 01 Dec 2011 06:26:20 UTC | #894610

Go to: UPDATED: Muslim medical students boycotting lectures on evolution... because it 'clashes with the Koran'

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 120 by Vicktor

Maybe these Muslim medical students walked out of class to perform one of their compulsory 5 daily prayers. It's what they're supposed to do in any case because there is nothing (aside from the 'shahada') that is more important to them.

Thu, 01 Dec 2011 00:50:23 UTC | #894566

Go to: Buddhist Retreat

Vicktor's Avatar Jump to comment 16 by Vicktor

Sorry, "rationalists" with a soft spot for Buddhism. Medical science has put both hands firmly at the back of its head, and thrusted its legs up into the air, slamming them on the table in contentment of the fact that we are all going to - and absolutely should - die at some point. If you want "continuity" of any kind, get them to change this mindset (if that's possible).

Sun, 27 Nov 2011 06:14:34 UTC | #893511