This site is not maintained. Click here for the new website of Richard Dawkins.

Apoptosis and Signal Transduction

From Drew Berry's post here:

There is one project that I did solve the problem of creating random, brownian motion not look directed: My Apoptosis and Signal Transduction.

YouTube video:

http://tinyurl.com/apopSignal

This was an exploration of what a signal transduction would 'look like' if you were to follow the chain of molecular events along a pathway. I published that animation in Science Journal's STKE ( (Molecular Animation of Cell Death Mediated by the Fas Pathway, Sci. STKE 2007 (380).

The technique I used to make it work was difficult and very slow to pull off. The whole 4 min sequence took me around 12 months to research, construct and generate the imagery. I think visually it is my most successful piece at showing the mechanisms that emerge from randomly wandering, cytoplasmic molecules and membrane bound receptors.

Video:

Original YouTube video

TAGGED: BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, SCIENCE


RELATED CONTENT

Bonobo makes stone tools like early...

Hannah Krakauer - New Scientist Comments

Kanzi the bonobo is able to create and use stone tools

Scientists Discover Previously Unknown...

- - URMC Comments

Newer Imaging Technique Brings ‘Glymphatic System’ to Light

Grey parrots use reasoning where...

- - The Royal Society Comments

Research suggesting that grey parrots can reason about cause and effect from audio cues alone- a skill that monkeys and dogs lack- is presented in Proceedings of the Royal Society B today.

Why do organisms build tissues they...

- - Science Blog Comments

Why, after millions of years of evolution, do organisms build structures that seemingly serve no purpose?

New flat-faced human species possibly...

Charles Choi - CBS News Comments

Four decades ago, in 1972, the Koobi Fora Research Project discovered the enigmatic fossilized skull known as KNM-ER 1470 which ignited a now long-standing debate about how many different species of early Homos existed.

A New Species Discovered ... On Flickr

Adam Cole - NPR Comments

One day in May of 2011, Shaun Winterton was looking at pictures of bugs on the Internet when something unusual caught his eye. It was a close shot of a green lacewing — an insect he knew well — but on its wing was an unfamiliar network of black lines and a few flecks of blue.

MORE

MORE BY DREW BERRY

MORE

Comments

Comment RSS Feed

Please sign in or register to comment